Turning Points In Dr. Mullins

Improved Essays
The extremely creative writer Mark Noll of Wheaton College (Illinois) on his inspiring survey of the history of Christianity designed for the general reader. Dr. Noll graduated from Wheaton as an English major and from Vanderbilt with his PhD in the
History of Christianity in 1975. After four years of Trinity College (IL), Noll joined the Wheaton
College in 1979. Author of several other books.

Unlike the usual this book is one fact after another church history "turning points" Dr Noll end each chapter with a prayer a figure related in some way to the turning points, this twelve textbooks volume populate the market, and builds the story of the growth and extension of the church around these. Noll readily admits that these are not the
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Thirteen turning points are described in the book as:
1-In the “Fall of Jerusalem (70), “Noll looks at the background of the fall of the great city, to see the way the Church, marginalized the growth of Christianity.
2-The “Council of Nicaea (325),” Christianity becomes the defatco religion of Europe that marks the turning point of a persecuted religious movement to a popular institutionalized religion.
3-In the “Council (451),” as the church gets threatened with disunity and deep controversy, doctrinal problems (against heresies like Nestorianism, disputes over Christology) need to be dealt with it.
4-In Benedict’s Rule (530),” we read about the rise of the Monastic movement through the
Middle Age.
5-In “The Coronation of Charlemagne (800),” we see a Christianity peak in influence and stature, and how the Church becomes the focus and gain power of the society.
6-In “ The Great Schism (1054),” we see how the Church splits into East and West, in somewhat become separated politically and theologically major differences like the filioque and the and the iconoclasmic
controversies,
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Three of Noll 's chapters deal primarily with issues of church and state. For instance, the author uses the coronation of Charlemagne to launch an incisive examination of how the papacy entered into a cooperative relationship with the Christendom, produced by medieval synthesis. Further, one of
Noll 's interpretive handles for assessing the Protestant Reformation is the English Act of Supremacy, in which Parliament declared that Henry VIII was the supreme head of the Anglican church. Finally, Noll views the dechristianization program of the French Revolution as a symbol of secularization and the concomitant demise of Christendom.
The authors believe the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) was a key turning point. He identify three crucial developments. (1) encouraged lay Catholic piety,
(2) emphasized Christ 's unique role as mediator,
(3) accepted limited blame for inciting the Reformation Dr. Noll’s, makes a broad reference to "the Nestorian `Monophysite ' position". In addition, he is too optimistic about the contributions of secular rulers to the conversion of barbarian Europe. Still,

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