Identity In China

1844 Words 7 Pages
Humans have many different characteristics that make up their identity. It could include their nationality, ethnicity, tribe, religion, etc. That is only one aspect of what makes an identity, the other would be how strong a person feels about one part of their identity over the other. If you asked an American citizen who they were, what would they answer? Would they say that firstly they are American, Baptist, White, or some other characteristic? Would they be willing to compromise the very values and ideas that make up their identity before the laws and government that rule over them? This gets to the point of the Central Asian Muslims in Xinjiang province of China. During the 18th Century the Manchus incorporated the land the Central Asian …show more content…
In 1731 Emin Khwaja and the Turfanese battled with the Zunghars Mongols with a little help from the Qing army. Initially successful the Turfanese were defeated and relocated to Guazhou in Gansu province in the Qing Empire. (Kim 606-7) Kim, the author of this work, details that this became the “turning point” for Emin Khwaja and his relationship with the Qing. The author notes that Emin Khwaja formulates documents for his people and for the Emperor to justify the protection that the Turfanese need under the Qing empire. The Qing mindset is of a political state, where they saw that the Turfanese shared a common enemy and they relocated within their borders. Thus, they had an obligation to protect them from outside nomadic tribes. Emin described it in a different way, Kim uses the term “grace” to describe it. Simply put, Emin argues that it was not the Emperor 's obligation to protect the Turfanese, but it was by the emperor 's grace that the Turfanese are protected. (Kim 607-8) Kim describes that Emin uses this language in terms of the Inner Asia political concept of Nomadic Overlords and their Subjects. (Kim 608) Emin uses this language, and the many pleasantries to ensure that the Emperor sees the Turfanese as his subjects and that he must protect them. However, when Emin turns to his people to present his argument to the …show more content…
It is a story that surrounds a woman named Xiang Fei (sometimes known as Rong Fei). A woman who 's body emitted an enticing fragrance without need for oils or perfumes. (Millward 428) She was from Xinjiang province, in an area controlled by the Altishahr. When recently conquered, Qianlong heard the legend of this woman and immediately ordered for her to appear in the Imperial Palace. She was taken as a concubine by Qianlong but she remained steadfast to her Muslim beliefs and was chaste and cold to Qianlong 's advances. (Millward 428) Qianlong was undaunted by this development and tried to win her over slowly with gifts. Qianlong also established an encampment of Muslims just outside the walls. In the hopes that this would relieve her homesickness as she could see them pray in the Mosques outside the walls. (Millward 430) Qianlong 's mother, the Empress, grew weary of Xiang Fei and demanded that she start acting like a proper concubine. When Xiang Fei stood by her Muslim morals, the Empress “granted her the favor of death.” (Millward 429) When Qianlong was away, the Empress strangled her. Hearing of the tragedy, Qianlong rushed back to his palace where he found Xiang Fei deceased on the floor. (Millward 429) Millward sees the legend of Xiang Fei as an allegory of the relationship between the Altishahr people and the Qing dynasty. (Millward 431) Where the Altishahr people were incorporated into Empire, were

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