Turbulence Theory In School Leadership

1243 Words 5 Pages
We can recognize, then, that both Heifetz and Gross understand turbulence—or disequilibrium—as a necessary tool for leaders to use in transforming their organization. Yet, Heifetz warns leaders to be cautious when dealing with disequilibrium because they can “risk job, reputation, and perhaps life” (p. 236). In respect to school leaders who desire equity, the loss of life may be extreme; however, the loss of their job or damage to their reputation may be a reality “because they come to represent loss, real or perceived, to those members of the community who feel that they have gotten, or might get, the bad end of a bargain” (p. 236). Furthermore, Heifetz makes the assertion that when “disequilibrium is rising, the expectations and frustrations …show more content…
Bjorkedal used turbulence theory in her dissertation to examine similarities and differences in how district administrators in Pennsylvania responded to both external forces and pressures. Bjorkedal argued that her study analyzed the influence that external accountabilities had on the stability of school administration, extending Gross’s discussion of changes and stability that administrator’s experience. Bjorkedal explains her reasoning for using turbulence theory as a theoretical lens, tells us …show more content…
Beabout (2012), argues that turbulence theory is limited in its scope towards organizational change. According to Beabout (2012), turbulence as a variable of unpredictable change “is not necessarily denoted by measureable changes in environmental conditions, just a human perception of this possibility” (p. 17). Beabout’s actual perception of turbulence is limited to a sensible feeling experienced by school staff during change. Due to this perception, then, Beabout proposes the concept of “perturbance” as a higher order system of participatory action by members who are experiencing turbulence. In fact, Beabout (2012) makes the following statement about the distinction between turbulence and

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