Tutankhamun's Tombs

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In Tutankhamun’s tomb, the artifacts were able to depict the lifestyle of kings in ancient Egypt. In his tomb, discoverers found many artifacts dating to over 3,000 years ago. The greatest treasure that laid inside the room, was the coffin of Tutankhamun. With a room untouched for thousands of years, scientists were able to study these artifacts to learn a lot of information especially about the lifestyle of kings in ancient Egypt. For historians, the life of Ancient Egypt during the New Kingdom was full of unknowns until the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb. On November 4th, 1922, Howard Carter discovered the Tomb of Tutankhamun in the Valley of the Tombs. However, it wasn’t until March 1923, until Carter and his crew actually entered …show more content…
The smallest, or innermost coffin, was built with a wood base covered with a thick layer of gold. In total, the innermost coffin was 296 pounds of solid gold! Lying next to himself was an ostrich fan, signifying that he enjoyed hunting ostriches for sport. Since the forty-two feathers have weathered by now, the handle tells the story of the king hunting down ostriches to make this fan. To exemplify his passion for hunting ostriches, located in the antechamber was a painting of him hunting an ostrich on a chariot, and on the other side him killing the prey. That said, ostrich feathers were viewed as luxury items fit for the king. Another interesting object was the two daggers that we found inside of the mummies’ bandages. One of the dagger’s blade was made out of gold, but the other one is more unique. The blade was made out of iron, but it wasn’t just any iron. It was made out of “iron from the sky” which scientific research tracked the iron from a …show more content…
That said, King Tutankhamun had very good relations with his other kingdoms and empires at this time. When Tutankhamun was in power, he usually stayed was in Memphis, and due to its geographical location, communication with other kingdoms and empires were very difficult through the arid deserts. The only other route available would be through the Nile river which then was a very tedious journey. This shows how rich Tutankhamun’s empire was because the deserts to the east and west were dangerous to cross, so the only way for material to reach Tutankhamun’s empire would be by foot and then by boat. For example, to get lapis lazuli, a merchant would have trek down to the Arabian sea to travel a few thousand miles to get to the tip of the Gulf of Suez, to then trek through the Eastern Desert to finally reach Memphis. Then again, Tutankhamun had gained his respect by rebuilding and reopening traditional temples in the new capital of

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