Essay On The Truman's Decision To Drop The Atomic Bomb

1845 Words 8 Pages
Since becoming a superpower, the United States has often fought for its interests through tactics that many consider morally questionable. In September 1939, Germany invaded Poland, and WWII began. On December 7, 1941, Japan dropped bombs on the United States’ naval base at Pearl Harbor, and the United States joined the war. In 1943, American scientists worked to develop the atomic bomb in hopes of ending the war. When Truman became President, he had to make the world changing decision of whether or not to drop the atom bomb on Japan. Although Truman’s decision killed many Japanese civilians, continuing the war would have resulted in more American deaths and economic distress; therefore, Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb was justifiable. …show more content…
Scientists worked under the “brilliant physicist named J. Robert Oppenheimer”; the top secret project was known as the “Manhattan Project” (O’Neal). Despite the fact that many members of Congress were unaware of the secret plan, the Manhattan Project received two billion dollars of federal funding. In May 1945, the United States no longer had to worry about Hitler and the Nazis as Germany finally surrendered. Conversely, the war in the Pacific seemed like it would never end. Finally, on July 16, 1945, American scientists found their answer -- the atomic bomb. “Two weeks after Roosevelt died, on April 24 Truman received a brief, mysterious letter from Secretary Stimson” in which he learned the true reason behind the Manhattan Project (O’Neal). On July 16, the “Trinity” test concluded that the world’s first atomic weapon was a success, and Truman had to make a decision. Truman then gave the world changing order to drop the atomic bomb on July 24. On August 6, the atomic bomb destroyed the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Only eight days later, Japan surrendered and the war was over. Although Truman’s decision killed many Japanese civilians, continuing the war would have resulted in more American deaths and economic distress; therefore, Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb is justifiable. American troops spent months island hopping through the Pacific. The battles fought on Japanese beaches were …show more content…
But, how awful is Rwanda at this time, you might ask? The subcommittee on Africa wrote to President Bill Clinton, “Mr. President, the lives of thousands of innocent civilians are at stake” (Fisanick). Two days after the letters had been received, the White House responded that the Rwandans should end the killings themselves. True ignorance on the part of the United States could pass as an excuse to let nearly 1,000,000 people die, but the U.S. did have knowledge of the horrific events occurring and chose to do nothing which is unjustifiable in every sense. Even after the United States was informed of the horrific killings, “On May 27, President Clinton met with the UN Secretary-General and declined to commit any U.S. forces to Rwanda” (Fisanick). To make matters worse, the United Nations failed to respond to the genocide; furthermore, “The major reason for Security Council inaction was the criticism and opposition by the United States” (Fisanick). The United States has always believed in protecting democracy, hence the involvement in WWI and WWII. However, if the United States wishes to have a neutral foreign policy, then that is what it should be -- the United States cannot pick and choose which nations to help. Nearly four years after the genocide, President Clinton went on a visit to Rwanda. In an attempt to right his wrongs, President

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