Truman Foreign Policy Essay

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By the early years of the Cold War, American foreign policy had to make some serious changes to adapt to the radically different political landscape of the post-World War II years. The Potsdam Conference of 1945 marked the beginning of tensions between U.S. and foreign interests, with the disagreement between Truman and Stalin over territory. The tensions were further exacerbated by the Truman Doctrine, which proclaimed that the United States would give aid to any country that wanted democracy and democratic values. The U.S.S.R. finally reacted to these tensions when the North Atlantic Treaty Organization was formed in 1949 because Russia saw the resolution “an attack on one is an attack on all” as threatening to Russian interests, and decided …show more content…
This goal was especially apparent in Truman’s 1947 speech, in which he argued that the differences between democracy and totalitarianism were so great that each person and country in the world had to decide between the two, and that there was no possibility for indecisiveness. This polarization of the world was a tool Truman used to persuade people that democracy was the only way to run a successful country, and the comparison of democratic and totalitarian ideals was intended to persuade people to believe that democracy was the best option for government. Truman’s perspective as a U.S. president was especially important because Truman had access to classified information, and was therefore more educated in matters related to threats to America. This means that Truman saw the polarization of the world as a benefit to American interests, because Truman would only endorse a foreign policy plan that he thought guaranteed to work because Truman saw the implications of a nuclear war with other countries. A cartoon also reflected the goals of American foreign policy because Americans were concerned about growing wealth gaps in developing countries, and many Americans thought that democracy would smooth out inequalities in developing countries. This desire to help developing countries and to further democratic ideals was …show more content…
foreign policy was the primary way in which Americans reached foreign policy goals. It is important to note, however, that American militarization was not always accepted by foreign countries. Indeed, Rhee’s statement indicated that American aid was not always seen as a benefit, and that many countries preferred to handle their affairs without intervention. Rhee’s statement is interesting considering that he was president while a major civil war was happening, which means that he must have either felt that his side would win the war, or disliked the thought of American intervention so much that he would rather fight the war without any assistance. Acheson’s testimony indicates that Americans thought military force was absolutely necessary to further democracy, and that the “collective security” of America was worth any amount of bloodshed. Acheson’s argument also indicates that Americans were so fearful of communism that they were willing to fight another war so soon after World War II just to end the possibility of communism’s growth abroad. In addition to explaining the feelings of fear that Americans were experiencing, Acheson’s argument also has a very simple purpose; Acheson wants to persuade people that, no matter what gains communism makes, Americans will always persevere and will resist any form of compromise or agreement. This was meant to encourage Americans that the fight against communism was not going poorly, and that Americans

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