Trifles And A Jury Of Her Peers, By Susan Glaspell

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The author Susan Glaspell is well known for her work on Trifles and A Jury of Her Peers. Glaspell was “inspired to first write Trifles in 1916 from a murder trial that she reported on in 1900 (Pingkan).” Not only did her experience as a court room reporter help to inspire Trifles but also a year later the story version of the play called A Jury of Her Peers. While the real murder that occurred in 1900 that inspired both works were influential, the time period also inspired these works. Glaspell lived in the early 1900s and was influenced by the beginning of the women’s rights movement. She herself was very concerned about women’s rights and it can be seen in both of the works. Susan Glaspell 's work particularly Trifles was influenced by her …show more content…
In 1899, she graduated from Drake University and took a job as a reporter for the Des Moines Daily News. It was during the time when she started to become interested in writing and after eighteen months of covering statehouse politics, she was assigned to report on a murder case: the homicide of John Hossack, who had been murdered in his sleep by his wife. During the time of the trial, Susan started to have an “evolving portrait of Mrs. Hossack which sheds light on Glaspell 's thinking and sympathies--and these news articles foreshadow the themes she later developed in Trifles and "A Jury of Her Peers” (Bryan).” It was after this trial that Susan Glaspell retired from the Des Moines Daily News and began to write …show more content…
Mrs. Wright was the most influenced by the struggle of women because she defied the man in her life and set out to free herself from unhappy marriage. Out of all the characters in this play that were influenced by the beginning of the women’s rights movement, “Mrs. Wright was an outgoing woman who became disgusted by her lifestyle and decided to put an end to it. She made the decision to put herself out of the misery of being tied down and unappreciated for what she truly could have been” (Institution). Glaspell used this play as a way to explore the idea that women were more than capable of being equal to men and deserved these rights no matter the personal

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