Treaty Of Versailles In Germany Essay

1267 Words 5 Pages
It was not-so-well predicted, but World War I was a massive turnpoint for the worldly powers in the early 1900s. With an estimated 38 million deaths, the blame had to be put on someone’s blood-covered hands, and who better to blame than the country that inexorably lost the war? Yes, the number one country, Germany, had fallen after World War I, both financially and in their world standings. Even with the destruction of their country and economy, Germany was still burdened with the Treaty of Versailles, holding the country accountable financially and morally for what happened during World War I. Though persons of Germany in post-World War I times would blame the effects of the Treaty of Versailles for the start of World War II, it is quite evident …show more content…
In his biography, Mein Kampf, Hitler says, “…propaganda I initiated against the peace treaty of Versailles, which I introduced by some enlightenment regarding the treaty of Brest-Litovsk. I contrasted the two peace treaties, compared them point for point, showed the actual boundless humanity of the [Brest-Litovsk] treaty compared to the inhuman cruelty of the [Versailles treaty], and the result was telling.” This quote demonstrates the injustice seen through Adolf Hitler’s eyes and the beliefs he held against the Treaty of Versailles. He would later use this hatred of the treaty and those who supported it in order to rise up the Nazi party and become its …show more content…
On the first of September in 1939, the country of Poland was invaded by none other than a Nazi-controlled Germany. With the treaty in place, which stated that Germany was restricted in their right to bear arms, therefore, the limited number of weapons would not have supported a military forceful enough to have the ability to invade a country. In fact, the Treaty of Versailles stated, “The maximum number of guns, machine guns, trench-mortars, rifles and the amount of ammunition and equipment which Germany is allowed to maintain…shall bear the same proportion to the amount authorized in Table No. III…” In table three of the Treaty of Versailles, Germany is held to a very distinct—and very low—guideline, specifying the exact maximum number of weapons that were allowed in the country. For example, the Allied Powers only allowed Germany to have six battleships under the treaty. How, then, was Germany able to execute plans involving the takeover of three different countries? This was due to the fact that most of the treaty and its threats were never carried

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