Trayvon And The Myth Of The Juvenile Justice System

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Analysis of Media Representations of Juvenile Delinquency or Juvenile Justice System In the article Trayvon and the Myth of the ‘Juvenile Superpredator’, Steve Drizin discusses the case of Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman in relation to the myth of the juvenile superpredator coined by John Dilulio. As we discussed in class, while this supposed new breed of criminals never surfaced, the myth that they would has changed how society sees certain adolescents. Drizin speaks on the fact that by 2001, the Surgeon General of the United States stated there was no evidence of these superpredators. However, George Zimmerman would have been in his mid-teens during the height of the myth and therefore at least had heard of it. Drizin’s theory is that …show more content…
Drizin also references the Surgeon General of the United States as having issued a report stating that there “is no evidence” that youth who were engaged in violence during the 1990’s “were more frequent or vicious than youth of earlier eras.” Lastly, he references George Zimmerman’s phone call with the police. He states that Zimmerman told police dispatchers that Trayvon was “suspicious-looking”, seemed to be “up to no good”, and “looked like he was on drugs.” Zimmerman is also referenced as saying the guy “looks black”, was wearing a “gray hoodie”, that the guy was “just staring at him”, was “walking towards him”, “had his hands in his waistband”, and stating that “these assholes, they always get away” when Trayvon began to run. While no citations of source are used, the presentation of these statements causes the reader to think these phrases in quotations are being taken from reports. However, since the sources are not cited, we are unable to check their legitimacy. The article addresses how the myth of the superpredator may have affected George Zimmerman in this cause, but a perspective it doesn’t discuss is how this myth may have affected Trayvon Martin. Furthermore, it doesn’t discuss …show more content…
The generation that was growing up when this myth began is now in adulthood, is making the laws and running society, and the evidence of this myth is being seen. The major difference I see now is that in the Central Park Five case, the youth were dangerous and needed to be put away whereas today, the youth that fit the same mold are being shot in the streets instead of going through the courts. The problems and fear that began with Houses of Refuge movement in the 1820s are still alive today and only seem to be getting

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