Hmong Culture Analysis

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The Hmong people have endured the persecution and killing of their people. They have experienced the oppression and hardships involved in immigrating to a new country with new customs and new values. It is not a surprise that the Hmong culture is gradually decreasing as time goes by (Nursing 220, 2016). The younger generations growing up in America are not as inclined to learn about the old customs (The Split Horn, 2001). It the future, there will not be many people left to teach the young Hmong people their traditions and about their history in Laos. There is a rising barrier that is growing between the older and younger generations starting in the migration out of Thailand (Yang, 2008, p.80). The barrier has only grown since settling in America …show more content…
While they all knew that Laos was no longer safe, the old generations did not like the idea of migrating to America (Yang, 2008, p.87). The older generations were worried that if they moved to America, their souls would not be able to get back across the ocean to Laos and the lands where their ancestors are buried (The Split Horn, 2001). They wanted to stay in the lands closer to their ancestors and keep the traditional life that they have always known (Yang, 2008, p.69). While the older generations wanted the best lives for their children, they also wanted to keep their family together. Family has always been a huge part of the Hmong culture (Yang, 2008, p.26). The younger generations wanted what was best for their kids and that meant going to America. America would have the education needed to become doctors and lawyers and all Hmong people would have the opportunity to become an “educated person” (Yang, 2008, p.82). Education was not as important for the older generations when living in Laos as it was for the younger generations looking for a new life in America (The Split Horn, 2001). Even in Yang’s book, the grandmother did not bother to learn English like the rest of her family and instead used cards in order for people around her to help her (Yang, 2008, p.155). The older and younger generations also had similar and different views …show more content…
Both the younger and older generations believed that marrying into their own clan was taboo. They believed it similar to how we view incest (Hmong Panel, 2016). They see it as an insult to their ancestors and it is highly looked down upon in both young and older generation. They even believe that their ancestors can bring evil to both families of the couple. There is a harsh stigma for those that try to marry inside their own clan, but is still happens occasionally (Hmong Panel, 2016). Another similarity in views of marriage is idea that the woman will take on the man’s name and the enter into the man’s family while getting more distant from her own family in the process (The Split Horn, 2001). It is common for the wife to leave her old family behind in order to take over responsibilities in her husband’s family. In Yang’s book, Kalia’s mother left her brothers and mother behind in the jungle when she married Kalia’s father (Yang, 2008, p. 17). Yang talks about her mother’s experience when getting married and says, “They said she was leaving the family that had taken care of her for another” (Yang, 2008, p.16). The Hmong culture is strong, but not all feelings are the same over

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