Transatlantic Slave Trade Research Paper

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Although separated by the second largest ocean in the world, the Americans, Europe, and Africa all display an infusion of all three cultures dating back to the beginning of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. Out of the three societies, Africans felt the greatest impact of shift in culture. Not to be considered one distinct group, each new wave of a new African tribe, along with the American influence altered the preexisting cultures of Africans in the Americas creating a new creole identity within the New World. Brought by ships, Africans attempted to maintain their heritage, though ideas and beliefs remained a total recreation was impossible. With a continuous shift in majorities and minorities over time, the social practices of Africans and …show more content…
These slaves; however, shared minimal beliefs, languages, and social constructs, forcing them to integrate their cultures in order to endure the hardships of slavery. Brazil saw the greatest increase in African population during the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, first with a large importation of Senegambian slaves during the 16th century, following by a dominating Angolan slave society in the 17th century, then in the 18th century slaves from the Mina Coast and Benin were a strong influence in the mining caves, and in the last fifty years of the slave trade the Yoruba were prevalent in the northern part of Brazil. With the constant shift in majorities, slaves had to infuse their cultures in order communicate and build safe communities to survive the harsh conditions of slavery. With each new wave of people, came new adoptions to the already mixed culture in the Americas. This continuous shift of ethnicities occurs in every corner of the Americas, Haiti experiences this with its Central African, Benin and Igbo population, illustrating how so many places have a mix of African cultures in their society. Also, because of the proximity to the Europeans, African developed some cultural influence from them. Surrounded by the white culture, there was constant exchange which was almost always forced upon them. To make life more bearable, the African would adopt …show more content…
Although, slaves remained “inferior” to the white man, the majorities managed to reconstruct parts of their language in the Americas. As James Sweet describes in his article, Baudry publishes a book Voyage to Louisiana where instead of describing Louisiana, he outlines a translation dictionary from the African to English. The fact that there is a translation depicts that the Europeans allowed for some words to remain useful in Haiti and now they must learn them. Allowed to speak their own speech, Africans attempt to create a culture they had. It’s a small instance of recreation; however, this shows the European culture was not forced in absolute on them. Another example of African reproduction, comes from the lingua general de Mina. Here is another translation dictionary in which Kimbundu is converted into Portuguese; the master learns the language of the slaves. Ironically, some of these Kimbundu words are found in Portuguese official documents. The significant of this integration into the European language indicates that some aspects of African culture survives in the Americas. Although, there are some places that allow African languages to be used, usually the slaves were forced to learn their rulers tongue. Seen in British North America, majority of Africans (if they spoke English) spoke a “broken” English. This was

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