History Of The Trail Of Tears

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What was the Trail of Tears?
The Trail of Tears was the beginning of the end for the Native Americans. The conflict started back in the 1800s when white people began to settle in the Native American territory leaving them with nothing in the end. People who settled on the western frontier feared the Natives and their savage ways. The Natives wanted nothing to do with the settlers and the settlers wanted the land they thought they were duly entitled to. George Washington, the President at the time, thought the only way to solve this problem was to “civilize” the Indians and both parties would be happy. This idea was to make the Indians as much like the whites as possible, meaning they would have to convert to Christianity, learn to speak
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The Natives were promised this land to be “Indian Territory” and it would remain unmolested forever. However as the years came faster more whites were pushing westward into “Indian Territory”. The native land that was promised to them started to shrink. In the end Oklahoma became a state at this point the Indians were no longer around they were driven to their extinction by selfish white men who promised them land and peace. This is what is know today as the Trail of Tears. All the Indians wanted was land and peace but the whites couldn’t let them have it. They sacrificed their living style and some land hoping there could be peace between them, but the whites took everything they had. The Indians who opened their homelands and faith to the whites were betrayed with broken promises and war. All for what? Land money and greed. The Trail of Tears will be talked about for generations and generations to come it will never go unseen by the human …show more content…
An example would be the Trail of Tears where he killed off many innocent Natives. Growing up he was a smart boy and a brave on at that. Being only thirteen years old and going into military school, he and his brother Huge were sent into the British War to be couriers. The two brothers were captured by the British early in the war. Later that year Huge suffered from the small pox, Jackson managed to survive the fatal disease but need less to say his brother did not. A few months later Andrew Jackson was released and went home to find his mother had died. He was only fourteen at the time leaving him an orphan. Jacksons uncle came and took, he started to learn about the law and became a lawyer later in life. I think that Jackson had a rough life and he coped with it well for being so young. Before going into presidency he went back into the military where he was honored commander of the Tennessee Military. He lead his troops to victory at Horse Shoe Bend against the Indians. After his Success he was awarded with Major General, after defeating an army of seventy-five hundred troops against his own troops which was only five thousand. People know of his nickname “Old Hickory” he was said to be given this nickname by his fellow soldiers because he fought like and old hickory stump and was as hard headed as one. In 1822 Jackson was reelected into the US senate.

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