Trail Of Tears Dbq Essay

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Based on the documents that I studied and the text of the U.S. Constitution, I disagree with the statement that the U.S. government was justified in forcing the Indian tribes east of the Mississippi River to leave their homeland to move to the Oklahoma territory. I believe that the Natives were cheated out of their land

Document One summarizes the uphill battle between the Natives and the settlers. According to Document One, "Land greed was a big reason for the federal government's position on Indian removal." Also, "In 1802, the Georgia legislature signed a compact giving the federal government all of her claims to western lands in exchange for the government's pledge to extinguish all Indian titles to land within the state." and "… the
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According to Document Five, 15,665 people of the Cherokee Nation memorialized congress by protesting the Treaty of New Echola in February, 1838. In March, outraged American citizens throughout the country memorialized congress on behalf of the Cherokee. In April, congress tabled memorials protesting Cherokee removal. Federal troops were also ordered to prepare for roundup. In July, over 13,000 Cherokee were imprisoned in military stockades awaiting the break in a two-month drought. In October, the Trail of Tears begins for most Cherokee. Lastly, in December, a contingent led by Chief Jesse Bushyhead camped near present day Trail of Tears Park. Also, John Ross left the Cherokee homeland with the last group, who carried the records and laws of the Cherokee Nation. 5,000 Cherokees were trapped east of the Mississippi by harsh winter in which many died.

Document Six is a poem about the Trail of Tears. The author states in the fourth line of the poem, "How could we have believed all of their lies?" expressing the regret and betrayal felt by the Cherokee. Lines five and six show how cruel the settlers were," Leaving nothing but blood they slaughtered our mothers and daughters." Line three expressed how settlers the settlers made claims to the land, "they claimed this land was their 'Father's'". Lastly, line ten and eleven, " We believed their evil smiles, and believed that they would save

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