Tragic Flaw In Julius Caesar

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Flawed But Not Forgotten Every human has a flaw, but some can be the cause of their own demise. The flaw of Marcus Brutus in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare causes his own downfall as the tragedy unravels. Brutus is the tragic hero because he has all of the necessary traits a tragic hero needs, according to Aristotle. Aristotle defines a tragic hero as a man of noble stature or high position who causes his own destruction for a greater cause or principle. A flaw cannot be escaped, and Brutus discovers this the hard way. According to Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero, Brutus is the tragic hero in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare because he follows the five traits of a tragic hero which are noble …show more content…
Brutus’ tragic flaw is his loyalty to Rome, which comes from his lineage in Rome. He is too worried about doing what he thinks is right for Rome and the people of Rome that he becomes blindsided by all of the other things happening. The loyalty Brutus has to Rome leads him to killing Caesar. Caesar is destroying Rome right before his eyes and Brutus cannot just stand back and watch, but he is not quite sure what to do. Since Brutus has these conflicting thoughts, Cassius is able to successfully persuade Brutus into joining the conspirators. During Cassius’ speech, he offers to Brutus, “I have heard / Where many of the best respect in Rome / (Except immortal Caesar), speaking of Brutus” (I.ii.58-60). These words of Cassius sway Brutus’ mind and he begins to think that killing Caesar is the right thing. Killing Caesar starts a chain reaction, and eventually leads to Brutus taking his own life. Later in the play when Cassius suggests killing Antony as well, Brutus denies his request. Noble Brutus replies upon Cassius’ request, “Our course will seem too bloody, Caius Cassius” (II.i.162). Antony’s murder would cause the Romans to further lose trust in Brutus. Caesar and all relations to him being destroyed would cause Rome to think less of Brutus. This loyalty to Rome is Brutus’ tragic flaw that leads to the downfall of Brutus, the tragic …show more content…
Brutus follows this trait because his death evokes pity from the audience. His death is a symbol of him letting go because the guilt was too overwhelming. The last words of Brutus were, “Caesar, now be still; / I killed not thee with half so good a will” (V.v.50-1). These final words create a feeling of pity and sympathy from the audience. Antony cares about Brutus and how his fate turns out even though Antony is one of Brutus’ biggest enemies. This death not only evokes pity from the audience, but from his own enemies as well. Upon Brutus’ death Antony exclaims, “And say to all the word ‘This was a man’” (V.v.75). At one point Antony had wanted the most revenge on Brutus, but he has always believed that Brutus truly did have good intentions. A simple mistake that Brutus could not take back caused his own downfall. Catharsis is shown through Brutus’ death which makes him the tragic hero, according to Aristotle’s

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