Trace Learning In Koffka's Theory Of Trace Memory

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terminated, a trace of its effect remains in the brain. This trace, in turn, will influence all similar processes that occur in the future. According to this point of view, a process, which is caused by an experience, can occur only once in “pure” form; thereafter, all similar processes interact with the memory trace. The stronger the memory trace, the stronger its influence on the process; therefore, one’s conscious experience will tend to be more in accordance with the trace than with the process. With repetition, the trace becomes more and more influential over the process. In other words, as the animal solves more problems that are similar, it becomes a better problem solver. At this point in Gestalt theorizing, we see considerable agreement …show more content…
In my opinion, I would say that, yes, Koffka’s theory of trace memory provides a plausible rational for why people develop both positive and negative associations with particular people, events, or …show more content…
The first involves the gradual buildup of cell assemblies and phase sequence during infancy and early childhood. The latter results in the objects and events in the environment having a neurological representation. When this neural development has taken place, the child can think of an object or event, or series of objects and events, when it is not physically present. During this early learning, an enriched environment would be important for the child, including a wide variety of sights, sounds, textures, shapes, objects, and so on. The more that is represented on the neural level, the more the child can think about. The second kind of learning, according to Hebb, is explained more by Gestalt principles than by associationistic ones. Once the building blocks have been established, they can be rearranged in almost an infinite number of configurations. Later learning then is perceptual, rapid, and insightful. Hebb also said that the physical characteristics of the learning environment are very important. For any given task and for any given student, there is an optimal level of arousal that will allow most efficient learning. Because arousal level is controlled primarily by external stimulation, the level of stimulation in the learning environment will determine, to large extent, how much learning take place. What is needed is an optimal level of stimulation for both the task and the student at hand. Hebb advised that the

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