Totalitarianism In A Clockwork Orange, By Anthony Burgess

1384 Words 6 Pages
Anthony Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange is well discussed in the fourth chapter. Anthony Burgess, the British novelist is considered to be one of the newest and most talented of the younger British writers. Many critics have rated his novel A Clockwork Orange as one of Burgess' most brilliant achievements. The ability of an individual to make moral choices is the major theme of A Clockwork Orange. The society presented by Burgess deals with experiments and behaviour modification techniques on criminals. The citizens should be given the choice between the good and the evil. The state should not interfere and destroy the capacity for choice. Burgess points out that destroying the ability to choose evil also destroys the capacity to choose good. …show more content…
Anthony Burgess' novel, A Clockwork Orange, is a nightmarish vision of future Britain. Behavioural adjustment is taken to unsafe extremes in the protective for saving the request of a disconnected society. The novel varies from the standard model of the dystopia. The novel is self-depicted as a general public in its tragic hours, in the beginnings of totalitarianism. He views the world through an adolescent lens, Alex, a fifteen year-old criminal. Through these two ideal models, Burgess demonstrates the gathering of people that denotes a society as ‘dystopian, in the absence of a good decision. Burgess uses this to reveal the crude motivation of a dystopia, the ordering of social control and proficiency over human …show more content…
D. James’s The Children of Men and this from the fifth chapter. The setting for The Children of Men, a dystopian novel is a world of mass infertility. Dr.Theodore Faron, the protagonist is a doctor of philosophy and a historian of the Victorian age at Oxford University. He is divorced, a solitary man and a self confessed failure. P.D. James vents her anger against the decline and fall of the modern world, using Dr. Theo as her mouth piece. Zan Lyppiatt, is the Warden of England an equivalent position of the prime minister. His regime initially appears to be good. He provides comfort for the aging population, which results in voter’s apathy. Narrated in both first person and third person, the novel begins in the year 1995, known as the Year Omega. The fall in the population is due to various reasons, such as birth control, abortion and the spread of

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