Analysis Of The Movie 'Too Big To Fail'

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The economy went into a doomed era in 2008. Gigantic banks on Wall Street, which people often referred them as the heart of economy fell. The fraud emerged years later, when the banks were selling the synthetic CDOs. This became a chain reaction that links one another and put the world into deep recession. Too Big to Fail and The Big Short contributed to the ongoing narration of the 2008 financial crisis in a cinematic format, which also journalism, television, advertising and public relations took parts. Too Big to Fail was originally written by Andrew Ross Sorkin, who was an American journalist and financial columnist in New York Times in 2009. Sorkin revealed stories of the financial issues the banks and the United States government were …show more content…
This was the moment when television took stand in the film. News reports are often being played on televisions. Due to the fact, Too Big to Fail was based on true events, which happened three years before the movie was released. Therefore, the movie incorporated actual news reports and speeches to start the narration of the story. President George W. Bush’s speech was edited as part of the opening to reveal the fact he failed in believing the American Dream. The news reports in the film then brought up questions and purchase movement among the banks. According to NBC News, “…Bear Stearns is being sold in just two dollars of share to JP Morgan…” (Associated Press, 2008). This illustrated how leaden and realistic this movie will be. Additionally, the editing represented the failure of Wall Street and the president’s belief. Likewise, how the novel had vividly transformed into actual images once again to the audience in 2011. Too Big to Fail then had repeatedly being used as a reminder to the people that the United States cannot recommit the same error. Accordingly, this is the way that film contributed to the ongoing narrative of the 2008 financial crisis. In chronological order, Too Big to Fail is the aftermath of the economic crash. On the other hand in 2015, The Big Short displayed how professionals began to comprehend the fraud in the housing market slightly before the official announcement of bankruptcy of Bear

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