Analysis Of Slave On The Block By Langston Hughes

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Over the years, African-Americans have dealt with the strains of finding and becoming comfortable with their own identity in America. The reason for this is because from the time of slaves being brought into this country there has been two Americas; a “white” America and a “black” America. Both are the same country but divided by different means. The Americas are divided by the majority and minority groups. With African-Americans being the minority they are pressured into feeling as though they have to change who they are and how they act in order to be accepted. As time progresses, African-Americans begin to become authors, composers, and artist. They use their talents to connect with other African-Americans across the country as a way to …show more content…
In the short story “Slave on the Block,” written by Langston Hughes, he connects with his audience by writing from the viewpoint of a Caucasian couple, Michael and Anne. They are a “well to do” couple that lives in a suburb almost 20 miles from Harlem and love everything about the African-American or “negro” culture. Michael and Anne take frequent trips to Harlem to …show more content…
In the beginning of the story Michael and Anne adored everything about the African-American culture. They wanted black friends, they wanted to create black art, and they wanted to be accepted into the black community to a certain extent. Once Luther lived with them and began to speak his mind they no longer wanted him in their house. Hughes writes this story to show his audience how people love the black community for what they bring to the world but not for themselves as people. Even though Michael and Anne claimed to have loved African Americans they treated their workers as modern slaves. Hughes connects with his audience by explaining how the black community is viewed by the opposite race. Hughes’ viewpoint is what connects his work to the audience on the issue of black people not being accepted by who they are. Minorities across America would be able to connect if they were to ever come in contact with Americans like Michael and Anne who love blacks as “novelties” but not

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