Stream Of Consciousness Essay

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The primary experimental features of my piece pertain to tone and narrative voice. Mainly, this is evident in the story’s third person stream of consciousness narration, and innately contradictory tone. In undertaking such experiments, my writing exists within, but also develops and challenges, broader social, cultural, and literary frameworks. Thus, to contextualise my project, it is necessary to examine influences on my thematic approach, and the technical intricacies of my writing.
Firstly, my work expands upon stream of consciousness narration. Chan (2010, p.2) argues stream of consciousness originated as an essential literary experiment, stating, “…[writers] breached the last reaches of literature by exploring the psychological interior
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Moreover, Sandbank (1967, p.486) discerns, “…instead of two conflicting sentences or clauses, [Kafka] uses an adjective or adjectival phrase which serves to negate, partly or wholly, the noun it pretends to describe…instead of qualifying its denotation, it actually almost denies that it has a denotation.” Clearly, contradictory phrases can be logical, producing meaning beyond sheer …show more content…
The efficiency and subtlety with which Beckett and Kafka highlight contradictions profoundly resonates. Evidently, contradictions can be narrow and immediate, as well as broad and gradual. Therefore, while I aim for thematic and tonal clarity, I intend to achieve this through distinct incongruities. I also question why we cling to rational and coherent meanings, and aim to transcend such

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