The Importance Of Smoking In China

2028 Words 9 Pages
The Republic of China is the largest producer of tobacco in the world. The production of tobacco has been essential to the government’s revenue; contributing to health care, education, social welfare, and agricultural developments. There are more than 300 million smokers in China, however only 25 % of Chinese adults have a comprehensive understanding of the potential health affects and hazards that smoking causes. Even less are aware of how harmful second hand smoke is to the public. China has no smoke-free legislation in Health-care facilities, educational facilities, government and indoor offices, or restaurants. There are no fines issued for smoking to the establishment or the smoker. China has such a low tax on tobacco that it has little …show more content…
There have been a countless number of commercials that have been very detailed and at times very disturbing. What first seemed like a movement has now turned in to personal stories; a man with emphysema, a woman with amputated fingers, and a person sick in a hospital room. These commercials have brought the reality of non communicable diseases as a result of smoking to the consumers. It is no longer a statistic on paper or a what-if scenario; it is a person with a name and a family. At the end of the commercials, there are also help lines, like 1 (800) - Quit-Now, that offer individuals a way to get help because after all smoking is an addiction. However, China does not have this option. In fact, “Only 25% of Chinese adults have a comprehensive understanding of the specific health hazards of smoking. Less than one-third of adults are aware of the dangers of second hand smoke” (WHO 2014). Several places similarly have had growth, but it is clear that growth in certain places, specifically in China, has been stagnant. Although there has been significant efforts globally to reduce smoking, China has made less progress and as a result the population is at great risk for further development of non communicable(not transmittable) …show more content…
According to an article in the New York Times titled “China and the Toll of Smoking”, in 1972 the average number of cigarettes per smoker was 730 a year and in 2013 that number has seen a significant increase to about 6,200 cigarettes. Because tobacco production and sales by the State Tobacco Monopoly Administration have been contributing seven to ten percent of the total of government revenues, the Chinese government has been slow to recognize that they have a health crisis. The article continued to add that the “ International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project found that a majority of Chinese smokers do not know that smoking causes strokes, heart disease or any of the other deadly illnesses”. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) goes on to add that smoking causes Type 2 Diabetes; according to the CDC “smokers are 30–40% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers” (CDC 2014). Smoking makes diabetes hard to control and puts the individual at higher risk of heart and kidney disease, poor blood flow, possible amputation, ulcers, infections, Cancer, Retinopathy (an eye disease that can cause blindness), and Peripheral neuropathy (damaged nerves to the arms and legs) just to name a few of the non communicable diseases caused by smoking. However non communicable diseases are the distal effects of smoking. Some proximal causes

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