Scout Finch's Trial Analysis

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Scout Finch is the opposite of the stereotypical person in her time. First off, she is the exact opposite of a so called “Lady”, choosing to wear overalls and play with Jem all day over mid day brunches and fancy dresses. More importantly are Scout’s beliefs on society. Scout is in constant confusion as to why people are treated the way they are. Like why she can’t spend the night with Calpurnia, or why she can’t have dinner with a Cunningham. This troubles Scout the most, who just can’t wrap her brain around why she is limited on what she can do with good hearted people. As she progresses through her Character Arc she seems to gain more insight into why, yet this does not changer her opinion that it is unfair. This is further characterized …show more content…
She was definitely rooting for the underdog in this trial, Tom Robinson. He was definitely unfavorited in this trial, but not due to evidence, because he was black. Scouts beliefs and innocence blinded her to see the racism in the court room but she was definitely seeing the injustice of the trial. Scout didn’t fully understand why the court came to the verdict that it did, she knew it was wrong but ended up more confused than anything. Her whole family left that night feeling terrible about the injustice in the courtroom, whereas many of the townsfolk left feeling justice had been served. Jem in particularly took it hard, it was at this moment when he realized the world is an unjust place, that night took his innocence from …show more content…
After the trial the Ewell’s had nothing but hate for the Finch’s and Bob Ewell ( their Father) swore vengeance upon him. That fall Scout and Jem were heading home from the fall play, when they were attacked by Bob Ewell. Just as their fates seemed sealed, Boo Radley came out and saved them. He was supposed to be a freak, who murdered and killed, yet Scout found just the opposite. Scout realized that the people of the town could never hail him as the hero of that he is, the rumors about him would only worsen, possibly even lead to persecution. Which is the last thing a hero of his caliber deserves. This is when Scout comes to, two realizations, one being that the world she lives in is full of injustice. Two being that, you can never really understand somebody until imagine yourself in their shoes. She realizes this when she looks at the neighborhood she has seen everyday of her life, but from a different perspective it seems completely different. It was this event that gave Scout the beliefs, and values that contradict those around her so harshly. She has learned to not judge a situation you might not fully understand, one that the people of Maycomb, the people of that time period, should definitely pick up on

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