To Kill A Mockingbird Reflection

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To Kill a Mockingbird starts out in the small town known as Maycomb. This story is mainly about the “usual disease” that seems to have infected most living there and the result of prejudice and injustice due to racism. It begins with Jem and Scout still in their childhood, and their adventures in Maycomb. They focus on Boo Radley and the scary tales about him. Their friend Dill motivates them to try and get Boo to come out of his house. The novel shifts to Tom Robinson’s trial. Jem and Scout’s father takes on the hard trial hoping to help this innocent man. Tom is a black man accused of raping a white women, but the women’s facts don’t add up. During the trial you see that Tom is an innocent man but the jury and all of Maycomb declares him …show more content…
Maycomb was your average little racist southern town and growing up there as a white child would probably have you grow up to be prejudice like the older folks living there, but with the help and guidance of their father Atticus they seem to be on the right track. Atticus teaches key lessons throughout the story, always thinking of what is best for the kids. They learn valuable lessons like treating everyone the same no matter their social status, a hero is not someone with a gun but someone that dies with dignity, and killing a mockingbird is sin. These are significant moments that have helped raise the kids to becoming good …show more content…
The mockingbird symbolizes Tom Robinson and the case Atticus is faced with. "Which, gentlemen, we know is in itself a lie as black as Tom Robinson 's skin, a lie I do not have to point out to you. You know the truth, and the truth is this: some Negroes lie, some Negroes are immoral, some Negro men are not to be trusted around women—black or white. But this is a truth that applies to the human race and to no particular race of men. There is not a person in this courtroom who has never told a lie, who has never done an immoral thing, and there is no man living who has never looked upon a woman without desire."(ch. 20 pg. 47-48) “He was incapable of doing anything that would broach the inviolable sanctity of his conscience. He made the honorable decision, even when that decision was unpopular.” (Bret and Kate Mckay) He tried to explain to the kids that even though he never wanted a case like this, he had to do it or he couldn’t face the town or even them. He had to stand by his morals and his beliefs or be humiliated. The kids watch the trial and events that unfold with it, trying not to fight when people tell them rude things about their father. The kids learn to not be prejudice toward anyone no matter their skin color if all they do to the world is nothing but

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