To Kill A Mockingbird Diction Analysis

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To Kill a Mockingbird is a captivating novel following three years of a young girl her brother, and her father, written by the marvelous Harper Lee. The father, Atticus, is a lawyer in the 1930’s and is given a controversel case in which an African American man (Tom Robinson) is accused of raping a daughter of who is considered in the community to be “white trash”. Unfortunately, many schools have banned this book, because of the issues it discusses even though events like this have occured in the past of our shattered society. Even though this is a piece of fiction it contains examples of our past and allows readers to understand a fraction of what those falsely accused citizens had to go through. Not only does this novel contain a splendid …show more content…
Lee’s diction is camillian like and creates different diction for each complex situation. One specific occasion of flawless word choice is during the impactful court scene of To Kill a Mockingbird. Although, this snipet contains extremely overwhelming examples of prejudice the emotions are best felt through the thoughts of the children. Extensive opinions represented within how a child grasps the unclear racism that people …show more content…
Creating an image through the usage of a variety of words is what makes a book truly devine. Building a scene to lay the theme of the book is why Lee utilizes Imagery. For example when Lee delineates the court house, “The maycomb county courthouse was early Victorian presenting an unoffensive vista when seen from the North from the oter side, however, Greek revival columns clashed with a big nineteeth-century clock tower” (185). Vivid explainations of the design of the town’s court house including how it appears on every side and the contradicting architectual ideas. Imagery appeals to all senses and is not limited to sight. For instance, during the courtcase the clerk called up the witnesses, “ But someone was booming again ‘Mayella Violet Ewell’ a young girl walked to the witness stand”(203). One mighty voice yelling out a name and then a youthful lady paces down to her seat to give a testemony. Lee portays the sound and the picture like this to show a quintissential piece of the story. The clerk’s “booming” voice is a symbol of the man’s abiliy to be heard through a large group of people. Reading certain words can provide a sense of feeling even if it is targeted towards sight. While Tom Robinson is on the podium Lee tries to add minor phrases to show his nervousness. Robinson did not have the luxury of free speech on the

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