Tlatelolco Massacre

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Massacre of Tlatelolco’s Analysis
Exactly Forty-seven years ago, on October 2, 1968, a large group of students filled the Plaza de las Tres Culturas in Mexico City’s Tlatelolco where the Mexican government massacred hundreds of these harmonious protesters and making of this event a dark day in history. The Mexican government’s actions shocked many people throughout the country because they did not expect the Mexican government to massacre the students with so much aggression and force. The Mexican government deployed about ten thousand armed troops to surround the Plaza de las Tres Culturas and they started to shoot at the students without remorse. Hundreds of the students, were killed right in the plaza and many others died from the wounds because the Mexican government prevented doctors from treat
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The Mexican government saw the demands of the students as a threat to their dominance. The students’ movement began in 1968 when the students saw that the Mexican government’s misrepresented preference of hosting the Olympic Games and wasting millions of pesos on publicity, sports arenas, and hotels for the foreign athletes while their own people had no housing, no health care, little food to eat, and no chances of having a better life. The Massacre of Tlatelolco helped open the eyes of the world to see that the Mexican government did not have the Mexican people as their priority. Today, the students that were involved in the movement that lead to the dreadful event of the Massacre of Tlatelolco are the living reminder of the ruthless suppression of the Mexican government and shine some light on one

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