Tiananmen Square Movement Analysis

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1949 Revolution and 1989 Tiananmen Square protests Throughout history, there has been many revolutions or rebellions that sought to make changes in societies. One of the common changes people fight for is their country’s form of government. World-widely, uprisings calling for democratic ideas were more typical than which call for communist styles of government. However, cultural movements towards communist path have been more successful in China. Two of the events that took place in China, 1949 Revolution and 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, show the effect of people’s direct action to alter the form of government. While both Tiananmen Square protests and Revolution of 1949 occurred by the people’s will for their own ideal type of government, …show more content…
In the early to mid 1900’s, the middle and lower class faced many economical hardships. The country as a whole experienced humiliation and havoc by the influence of foreign powers. When Kuomintang government, the Nationalist Party, came into power, they were supposed to solve domestic problems and foreign problems, such as poor factory conditions, peasant poverty, and a war with Japan. The KMT government failed to fulfill these expectations of people, therefore, the communists gained power. At this period of time, people were desperate for economic betterment and this caused them to turn to the communist side of the government. The Communist Party was very attractive to people because not only they propagandized their ideas and won people to their side, but also they solved the problem with the Japanese by organizing effective guerrilla campaigns and bringing back some lands from foreign hands. Also, the Communist Party was able to free many areas from the warlords which favored the peasants. Now that they had much support from the people, Mao Zedong, Chinese Communist leader, declared to create the People’s Republic of China on October 1, 1949. In response to KMT government’s ineffectiveness, people’s desire to lead the country to their own ideal type of government hardened and it can be seen as it was caused by purely, people’s will. The similarity between this revolution and the …show more content…
In Chinese history, a time period when people’s interest in democratic ideas was a danger to the government was early and mid 20th century. Starting in early 1900’s, Chinese Nationalist Party grew and their domination of power was stabilizing until some problems began to emerge. The Nationalist Party was not capable of handling problems of peasants’ and therefore, at the same time, the opposing side gained support. People viewed the current government as corrupted and ineffective. The government kept being indifferent to the Japanese expansion in the west, but the communist party gave the people hope to solve the foreign affairs and the domestic ones, too. Consequently, as Communist Party strengthened, the idea of communism was widely supported. Later, when the People’s Republic of China was established, communism took root in Chinese society. The Revolution of 1949 was an uprising demanding a switch of the government to a pro-communism government. The revolution, also known as Chinese Communist Revolution, has shown the culture of Chinese society that deeply inherited Mao’s belief. However, the Tiananmen Square protesters’ belief contrasts the original Chinese idea of collectivism. The main reason that this massacre gained attention through Chinese normal people, and moreover, world widely, is that a radical movement demanding freedom of speech and freedom of press

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