Three Types Of Homelessness In America

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More than 3.5 million people experience homelessness each year in the U.S. 35% of homeless persons are families with children, 23% are U.S. military veterans, 25% are children under 18 years of age, 30% have experienced domestic violence, and 20-25% experience a mental illness. There are three types of homelessness: chronic homelessness, transitional homelessness, and episodic homelessness. Homelessness in America is a bigger issue than people may realize. Chronic homelessness is defined by a person being entrenched in a shelter system and is in a long-term housing arrangement rather than an emergency arrangement ("National Coalition for the Homeless Homelessness in America - National Coalition for the Homeless," n.d.). People who …show more content…
Many persons lack affordable housing. The U.S. Assistance programs have contributed to housing crisis/homelessness. The National Low Income Housing Coalition estimates that the housing wage is $18.79, $14.32 hourly wage earned by an average renter by $4.50 an hour for 2013. This exceeds wages earned by low income renter households. Another reason people become homeless is poverty. Poor people are often unable to pay for housing, food, healthcare, education, or childcare. When limited resources cover only some of the listed necessities, difficult choices must be made. The difficult choice is usually housing, since it’s the most money consuming out of the rest of the options. If a person is poor, that person is one paycheck issue, illness, or accident away from living on the streets. There are two factors that lead to poverty: lack of employment opportunities and decline in available public assistance. Other factors such as lack of affordable health care, mental illness, domestic violence, and addiction can contribute to …show more content…
A series of changes have been taken to better help the homeless population, but these procedures undercount the homeless population by failing to visit many locations with homeless populations. Therefor, the “changes” that were made may not be as drastic as people would like to think. The numbers for homeless people in America are still huge. Housing and Urban Developments Point-In-Time Survey, January 2013, states that 619,042 people were homeless in a single night in January. 85% were homeless, 15% in family households, 33% of all homeless youths under 24 years of age. 57, 849 veterans were homeless on one night in January 2013. 60% of which residing in shelters or transitional housing programs and 40% were without shelter. California (22%), New York (13%), Florida (8%), Texas (5%), and Massachusetts (3%) accounted for more than half the homeless populations for the U.S. in 2013. It’s an urban phenomenon that people are mostly homeless in cities. However, people find difficulties in small towns and rural areas as well. Homelessness is miscalculated due to the people using the service sites. Rural homelessness is a result of poverty and a lack of affordable housing. The odds for becoming poor are between 1.2 and 1.3 times higher in non-metropolitan areas. The people that tend to be homeless in rural areas are white, females, currently working, and homeless for the first time. These people tend to be

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