The Mexican Revolution In 1910: Porfirio Diaz

Superior Essays
The Mexican Revolution in 1910 was the war to end oppression in fighting the dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz, who had ruled Mexico for over thirty years. The war was fought for three major elements: political, social, and cultural. This has caused chaos among the citizens.The rising of poverty within the country had caused the great disparity between, both(frag.), the rich and the poor. Many of the Mexican were abused by the wealthy as the rich gets richer, while the poor gets poorer. Furthermore, this war also marked the changing period of the country, the war of modern versus traditional. Addition, the mexican revolution has impacted greatly on its citizens and its culture.
President Diaz wanted to develop Mexico into an industrial and modernize country. He
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Majority of his allies and supporters were small ranch owner, poor peasants, and workers. The leaders of Mexico Revolution includes: Francisco I. Madero, himself, Pascual Orozco, Francisco Villa, and Emiliano Zapata. Although Orozco and Villa have no experience in military skill, however, they were great in using their strategies and have gained the allegiance of the people from the Northern Mexico, Chihuahua, by early 1911. This had help Madero’s further his idea, the Plan of San Luis Potosi; the plan was to restore the Constitution of 1857, in which was ratified to established individual rights, such as, “...prohibited slavery and abridgments of freedom of speed or press…” and abolish the unlimited term of president. On May 25, 1911, President Porfirio Diaz resigned and fled to a different country, France. By 6 November 1911, Francisco I. Madero become the new President of Mexico, however, when the next presidential election comes he was unsuitable to surpass his opponent and fail to fulfill his promises to the people. Later, in 1913 he was assassinated by Victoriano

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