Three Goals Of Reconstruction

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During the Reconstruction of the splintered Southern states, many goals were set out with the purpose of supporting the newly freed African American people. These goals can be placed in three categories of political, economic, and social, of which before, African Americans had neither say nor any hope of advancement in during years of slavery. Politically and socially, these goals were focused on introducing blacks to the American society through legalized voting rights by means of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments and an introduction to civil rights. Economically, after the war and slavery, reconstructive goals were created to provide government assistance such as food and introduced African American people to the society of paid labor. …show more content…
However, through the reconstruction and learning institutions, African Americans were able to hold higher positions such as being delegates in the constitutional conventions and positions in almost every type of public offices (Brinkley 363). By holding such offices, it became possible for black voices to be heard easier through the word of black officials in a historically white government. Although, this step forward would not have been feasible had it not been for the publishing of the Fourteenth Amendment by the Joint Committee on Reconstruction in which American citizenship was redefined (Brinkley 358). It was this redefinition of whom could be an American citizen that finally allowed for black people to join political offices and to be allotted male …show more content…
Without the enforcement by military districts put in place to allow states to rejoin by ratifying the Fourteenth Amendment, the laws and amendments made to advance black people in society would have been a futile disaster (Breakley 359). Last, but perhaps one of the most important goals of the Reconstruction was the mass influx of focus on education and building public schools in the South. This radically reformed educational system was largely made possible by the previously mentioned Freedman’s Bureau and philanthropic Northerners as 4,000 schools were erected and staffed in order to teach over 200,000 students (Brinkley 364). Through this incredible development, in which for a vast majority of black and white students was a first in their education, came the modern public

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