Specific Deterrence Punishment

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In 1975 Andenaes defined deterrence as “influencing by fear”. In other words, potential offenders decide not to commit a crime because of the fear of apprehension or punishment. The chance of deterrence increases as the threat of punishment increases. A crime does not have to occur her just the diversion of future offender’s activities. Deterrence is a significant portion of crime prevention and a cornerstone of the criminal justice system. When it comes to deterrence it can be broken down into general and specific. General deterrence has the goal to impact more than just one offender. The apprehension and punishment of someone has the hopes of being an example to other offenders or potential offenders. General deterrence matches primary …show more content…
The goal of this is to hope that their experience of punishment will deter them from committing another future crimes. The punishment is only meant to punish the individual and nobody else. Specific deterrence matches tertiary prevention because it focuses on the activities of individuals from relapse and committing future criminal acts. Punishment is supposed to be seen as painful, so this is supposed to deter anyone from committing a crime or future crimes. The effects of deterrence of punishment relies of three factors. These three factors are the severity, certainty, and celerity of the punishment. Severity is making sure that the punishment that was provided was worse than the pleasure of committing the crime. The thought is that the individual will choose their behavior after weighing the benefits of the crime versus the cost of the crime if they are caught. The result of crime is that there is more pleasure from illegal activity instead of pain. Severity on the other hand seeks to eliminate the positivity and pleasure and replace it with negative unwanted …show more content…
It is believed that if the death penalty has a deterrent affect then the state with the death penalty will have lower rates. Ehrlich, an economist in 1977 believed there was a strong connection between the penalty and lower homicide rates. When comparing the death penalty to non-death penalty states it was founded that more than twenty homicides are deterred per every execution. Not only was this found, but the imprisonment length also lowered the homicide rate. When it comes to Ehrlich’s research it is methodological criticized. McGahey does not believe that simply designating states as non-death penalty and death penalty states reveals anything other than the penalty between the states. Other factors could have influenced the homicide rates other than the fat that the death penalty or non-death penalty was in place. There is a great variety of diversity within states. When it comes to the studies of certainty of punishments they do not naturally address the death penalty. In 1974 Tittle and Rowe researched the certainty of arrests and the overall effect of the crime rate. Using the date from Florida it was founded that the certainty of arrest had actually no effect when the arrest rate was very low. There is no connection between the certainty of arrests when it comes to punishment and the lower crime rates and the nature of the relationship is still not that

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