Three Dimensions Of Globalization And Gender

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There is no specific definition of globalization and there are various definitions for it. Globalization can be said to be a complex political, economic, cultural and geographic process in which the flow of organizations, ideas, capital and people are taken on an increasingly transnational form. Globalization can be viewed from different perspectives. There are three dimensions of globalization: economic, cultural and political. Technology is an important part of globalization. Advances in information technology have transformed economic life. Information technology has given individuals various tools by which they can identify and pursue economic opportunities. Globalization has affected gender culturally, politically and economically. In …show more content…
It affected women more than men. Da Gama Santos (1985) recognized that the gender division of labor and the differential positions of women and men in the spheres of production and reproduction would mean that the new policy shifts would lead to very different outcomes for women and men. Rising unemployment and fall in income for men in a household made women to take up extra productive and reproductive activities to provide for the family. The structural adjustment policies encouraged mobility of labor, which does not recognise women because they are constrained by family and childrearing responsibilities. Women were seen as dependents, which mean they couldn’t take decisions on their own without the consent of their father or husband. Privatization of industries was one of the policies and the private sector discriminates against females, this led to the loss of jobs of most female workers. Poverty came along with the structural adjustment and this affected mostly women with …show more content…
In Guatemala, women workers at an export shirt-making factory won a union contract (Moghadam, 1999). In the Middle East and North Africa, the involvement of women in paid employment has resulted in the politicization of women and of gender issues (Moghadam, 1999). In Morocco, the Democratic League of Women’s Rights organized a Round- table on the Rights of Workers in 1995, and a committee structure was subsequently formed, consisting of 12 participating organizations (Moghadam, 1999). The group seeks to revise the labor code to take into account women’s conditions, to include domestic workers in the definition of wage-workers and the delineation of their rights and benefits, to set the minimum work age at 15, and to provide workers on maternity leave with full salary and a job-back guarantee (Moghadam, 1999). In November 1995, some 500 women textile workers employed by the Manu- facture du Maroc factory outside Rabat went on strike for two weeks to pro- test “repeated violence” against several women employees (Moghadam, 1999). This included the arbitrary dismissal of the general secretary of the factory’s union of women workers, her subsequent rape by a foreman, and the firing of 17 women workers who protested the union leader’s dismissal and rape (Moghadam, 1999). This incident made the women to form human rights organizations in

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