Three Chinese Philosophies

Improved Essays
Three Chinese Philosophies
Bailee Cook

Have you ever wondered why or how China came to what it is now? Well, a lot of it has to do with the three Chinese philosophies which are Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism. All of these philosophies are basically completely different from each other, but they were all very popular in Ancient Chinese history. In the end, the three Chinese philosophies impacted Ancient and modern China in many different ways.

The first major Chinese philosophy was Confucianism. Confucianism was laid back, but strict to a point. What I mean by that is you had clear laws and rules to follow, and if you followed them you would get rewarded rather than punished. If you decided to overstep your boundaries and disobey your
…show more content…
Daoism was definitely the least strict out of all three philosophies. Laozi was the founder of Daoism, and he believed that to have a successful society you had rule the least amount possible. Laozi believed that everybody should live in peace, harmony, and agreement with the way of nature. Daoism is partly based off what is called Yin and Yang. Yin means “shadowed” and Yang means “sunlit.” Laozi feels that Yin and Yang represents human life because he said “human life is a whole made up of opposites” and that is what Yin and Yang is, a whole made up of opposites. Living a life full of happiness is also a big thing in teaching the way of Daoism. With all of these all of these beliefs, Laozi again felt that the best way to rule a society was to rule the least amount possible. As I said before, Daoism was by far the most laid back philosophy and I believe a very interesting one as …show more content…
Legalism had a very strict and harsh mindset behind it, and that is exactly what it turned out to be, strict and harsh. Legalism was executed in this way because people were too selfish to set a good example for each other. Therefore, people weren’t really allowed the chance to set an example for each other because when they were told to do something they would do it with no excuses or exceptions. If you failed to do the task you were given you would be severely punished and your ruler wouldn’t hesitate to do so. Hanfeizi created Legalism and he believed strict and harsh was the only way to rule and create a well organized society. In the end, Hanfeizi’s biggest goal was to have a well organized society and he felt the way he ruled accomplished that very well.

In conclusion, Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism had a huge effect on Ancient and modern China. The three Chinese philosophies all had very unique mindsets behind them and were executed very differently. All in all, each philosophy is unique and very smart in their own

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    In Lao Tzu’s ‘‘Thought from the Tao-te Ching’’and Machiavelli’s ‘‘The Quality of prince’’, they both develop how an outstanding ruler should be by striking a balance between the people and the ruler. Lao Tzu believes since human nature is a part of the holistic universe, all human beings should follow the Way in order to be original people. If the ruler is enlightened by the Way and Tao, he will not try to compete with others because the ruler realizes everything is ought to be moderate and appropriate for his people. Thus, Lao Tzu thinks that the ruler should be tolerant and flexible. However, Machiavelli insists that human nature is selfish and superficial.…

    • 1895 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Even though he did not define human nature in any way, Confucius said that all human beings are equal. Confucius’ theory would be valid if he had explained more about his beliefs and included everyone in them. The Analects are based on humanism, not metaphysics. Confucius was more worried about the basic human welfare and not so much the ultimate nature of the world. He was concerned on a better government that would help the well-being of the common people that would bring peace among the citizens.…

    • 751 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    24; Madsen 2011, p. 21). Both of them with its own patriotic organization succeeded in friendly atmosphere with policy, opening society and the development of middle class (Dubois 2010, p. 349). Firstly, the main idea of Taoism is to advocate the harmony of the three qi, which are great positive, the great negative and harmony, and the ascendancy of emperors and kings, to achieve the Great peace (Madsen 2011, p. 21). As Chinese people serve Gods described as existing everywhere in all times as a ‘third eye’ that monitor human actions, there is a belief that one is being observed decreases the tendency of crime, immorality and antisocial actions (Cao 2012, p. 2622). In short, Chinese culture has been formed by historical reverence for social and personal harmony that reinforces the socially responsible behavior (Cao 2012, p. 2622).…

    • 1171 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Philosophy Of Confucianism

    • 1627 Words
    • 7 Pages

    According to Confucius, in order to achieve these moral values people should have relationships, and good government. He believed that if the governor was a discipline ruler then the goodness would embody the society. He also believed that only males could lead the government service. Also, Confucius venerated education in high estimation, believing that throughout it, people could reach high life standards. The conception of Confucianism focused on the ultimate human life values, such as: social anarchy and cohesion, virtues and methods of self-discipline and self-cultivation.…

    • 1627 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Confucianism was the elite doctrine of well-educated, intellectual stratum of society. Daoism became a democratic philosophy, which searched for spontaneity and naturalness. Daoists were the opponents of Confucians considering that a person should not follow social doctrines. According to the former, it is necessary for human beings to long for natural and spontaneous behavior. Daoism also includes the idea of people’s inborn equality and need to come back to their natural state.…

    • 706 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Intelligence was deeply valued in Confucian philosophy. The foundation of society was family being the basic unit. It was said the men were made, not born, and all elders were to be respected. The Mandate of Heaven was a divine right to govern a dynasty. Each new ruler of a dynasty would have received the Mandate of Heaven but “ If a ruler governed badly or was immoral, the people could rise up in revolt.” Taoism heavily influenced sciences, technology, and arts of China .…

    • 1018 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Qin Dynasty Dbq Analysis

    • 666 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Qin dynasty was a short one, lasting between 221 and 206 BCE. This was during the Classical Era, the organization and reorganization of human societies. In this time period, there was the development religions, empires, and transregional trade routes. The first emperor, Qin Shi Huang, used harsh methods to greatly transform the Chinese government, including emphasizing legalistic values, killing all those who challenged him, and relying on his wealth and a strong military to get whatever he wanted. In document 1, it appears that Qin Shi Huang was an excellent emperor who equalized all laws and standards.…

    • 666 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Confucius thought xin as an indispensable value of human, and only those with xin could be appointed to high position. If there was one without xin, he called him a shallow person. Therfore, xin is a basis for keeping a group or even administrating a country because kings, presidents, and all the politicians should be trustworthy enough to rule the whole country. The people and nation have to trust what they are doing and follow and respect their…

    • 1520 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In Analects, Confucius supplies the rulebook for the ideal moral man. He states, “In a high position he does not domineer over his subordinates” (Analects 111). Confucius makes the point that overwhelming power and social status are a recipe for evil. Since Mao zeDong and his communist coup intervened with the natural tranquility of everyday life for those “subjects,” he embodies the cultural shift we see…

    • 1528 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Legalist followers believed that humans are bad by nature, therefore they need to be controlled by strict laws and punishments. Legalists believed that the only way to control an evil person, which they believe everyone is by nature, was through the threat of violence and punishment. On the other hand, Daoism had a very different view of human nature. Daoists regarded humans as just another part of nature, not better than any other thing. For this reason, they had no form of government or punishment.…

    • 815 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays