Three Branches Of The Texas Constitution

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The Texas Constitution is separated into three branches: The legislative, executive, and judicial branches. The legislative branch is composed by 150 members of the House of Representatives and by 31 members of the state senate. The House of Representatives are elected for two-year terms (represented by districts of about 166,000) and the Senators, who serve for four-year terms and serve about 800,000 people per Senator. They meet every odd-numbered year biannually. These meetings are held with the purpose of writing new laws and to solve issues of the state. This meting last 140 days and begins on the second Tuesday in January. The governor also has the power to designate special sessions, with the purpose of treating issues chosen …show more content…
The House of Representatives is made up of 435 representatives and the Senate of 100 members of the state. They also have 40 Senators and 80 Assembly members who represent the people of the state of California. The Representatives serve for two-years and the Senators for six-year terms. I understand that the California exceeds Texas’ population by almost 12 million people so I am assuming that the size of the state does not matter since there is a big difference in the representation that Texas has compared to California. However, New York is a state with two Senators and 27 Representatives and 8.4 million habitants. There is a huge difference among these states, but I still do not comprehend the relationship between population and …show more content…
He can grant or deny pardon if recommended by the Board of Pardons and Paroles. However, the Texas judicial system is one of the most complicated systems in the world. Texas total executions since 1976 ascend to 536 compared to Oklahoma (second after Texas), which has 112. Pardons are very rare in Texas, if not impossible. The death penalty case cost is about 2.3 million and three times more expensive than the cost of 40-year incarceration in a highest security facility. In comparison to Florida with 24 million cost per execution, North Carolina 2.16 million, and 4 billion in California for 13 people executed in total. Tax payers’ money is used to subsidize these endeavors. However, the death penalty in Texas is going to continue in place for many years, especially because when judges are elected they are already expected to hand down tough penalties in order to get re-elected, and also because the attorneys appointed by the court on capital murder cases have little or no experience handling these kind of

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