Boston Massacre By Thomas Paine Turning Point

Great Essays
The acclaimed author Thomas Paine wrote, “It is not in numbers, but in unity, that our great strength lies; yet our present numbers are sufficient to repel the force of all the world,” in his revolutionary pamphlet, Common Sense (Paine 36). He was only one of the many voices in the late 1700’s that yearned for America’s independence and made the effort to coax colonists into fighting for their freedom. The American colonies during this time felt as if they were stuck under Great Britain’s influence and believed that they were unable to become completely prosperous until they were finally in control. Published in 1776, Paine’s pamphlet was a collection of ideas regarding emancipation and was made to inspire the colonists of America to divide …show more content…
The pamphlet was one of the later factors in the fight for independence but it was also one of the biggest turning points. In an article it says, “Boston Tea Party...Boston Massacre...All of these events led to much tension between Great Britain and the America. What colonists were to do after these events led to much debate It was the right time for independence but the question of if they were actually going to do it arose. This is where Thomas Paine and his pamphlet Common Sense comes into the picture” ("Thomas Paine 's Role...). This concludes how the patriots who were behind these events were unsure of how their acts would ensure independence. Rebellious acts such as those would not stop the king and would have never on their own been strong enough to gain America’s freedom. The only thing that would do that was complete unity throughout America regarding breaking from Britain. If every colonist was against Britain the king wouldn’t stand a chance. This is exactly what Common Sense did by persuading thousands of colonists to join the cause. Many people also thought that the pamphlet led to other, more important documents, like the declaration of independence. In an online document it says "Common Sense’ was published five months before the Continental Congress wrote and signed the ‘Declaration of Independence.’ Many historians believe that ‘Common Sense’ was a major factor in causing the convention because it caused such a stir and change of popular opinion” (“Common Sense" and Declaration Rewrite...”). Not only did Paine’s work inspire the colonists, but it also helped in the creation of other historically significant events. In the same article it explains how Common Sense was the basis for the Declaration and that it could have possibly turned out quite different without Paine’s pamphlet as inspiration. Paine’s work was so influential to the people of America

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