Thomas Paine's Best Argument Analysis

Superior Essays
During the 17th and 18th centuries, the Enlightenment was a movement that motivated people to base their ideas to gain intellectual reasons on God, humanity, and nature. The idea was to gain logic, reasoning, critical thinking, and questioning which led to higher education. The Enlightenment influenced people to think philosophically. The Revolutionary War began in year 1775 and had ended in 1783. The war involved the British and the American colonists. The American War for Independence was influenced by the Enlightenment because it caused people to think and speak freely upon their own. More people spoke up on freedom and equality. Decades before the War began, the British and the American colonists meet with tension. The issues between the …show more content…
Daniel Leonard had a strong argument because he included that it must be painful to see what the British men may have been going through while they were getting harassed, that no one’s family should experience danger like the British men have went through. That persuades readers to feel emotionally for them. On the flip side, Edmund Burke has a great argument that there should be peace and only peace between the two, but continue the British’s role to be kept in governance. However, Thomas Paine stands strong for the Americans to protect their rights and fairness. The most compelling and convincing argument I find to be is Thomas Paine’s. The reason I choose Thomas Paine for the best argument is because he stated facts in his document by telling his “common sense”. He wanted the realization that even though the British did help the Americans, it is not their duty to rule their colonies and construct rules to people to go by in a country that is not theirs. The logos appeal more to me than pathos because using logos can blatantly give true evidence to support an argument, rather than to argue with pathos to convince an audience by thinking emotionally which can strongly change a person’s view. I liked both the analogies and statistics to get a good taste of what these three had to say for their arguments. The evidence they chose were all different, as far as the best evidence, Burke had logical evidence to complete his argument. However, Thomas Paine came strong with his argument to show his loyalty to his own country and

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