Thomas Malthus Theory Of Population

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In this paper, I will argue that Malthus’ theory is still relevant today based on the current global atmosphere of a world plagued by poverty, famine, and war. Thomas Malthus has a somewhat pessimistic outlook on the unprecedented population growth that the world is witnessing today. In his 1789 book, Essay on the Principle of Population, Thomas Malthus argued that human population increases faster than our food supply. Hence, if the population is left unchecked it would lead to an unbalance between production and reproduction resulting in the distortion of human habitation. Malthus suggests that the power of population is much greater than the power of earth to produce food for men. In his quest to illustrate how an unchecked population …show more content…
6). In Acknowledging the fact that resources will always be an integral part of our society Malthus suggests that if powers are not balanced equally it will result in increased pressure from population on food supply that would lead to misery in a given society. The mere basis of the conclusion that Malthus derived to which is the potential of population increase exceeds that of food production by a high margin and contrasting it to geometric rate at which population is capable of increasing with the athematic rate at which subsistence increases on. added more potency to Malthus’ claims (Winch, 1992). A vital part of Malthus’ theory reflects the mathematical insight that suggest population grows geometrically which puts forth pressure on food and resources if the instinct to reproduce is unchecked (Winch, …show more content…
Therefore, the price of labor will decrease, while the price of goods will keep rising, resulting in a lower-class society that will be unable to feed itself. Therefore, we need to consider the impact of income inequality today on the growing population because poor people will continue to reproduce off springs that they cannot feed as a result that will increase famine and put a strain on resources. A prime example of a population spiraling out of country that is affecting our existence is India. For decades India has been a victim of overpopulation plagued by poverty, lack of free education and bad living conditions. The main challenge that the Indian government has to tackle is the ramifications of the country’s unbounded population. Sure, one might argue that technological advances have improved our lives and genetically modified seeds has revolutionized agriculture. However, we failed to see its negative impacts such as the millions of jobs that were lost in India due to artificial intelligence (Lohar,

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