Thomas Jefferson Pros And Cons

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1-Thomas Jefferson has a lasting name in the history of the United States, for his major contributions in different fields. Among the different names of Founding Fathers, he is one of the prominent figures who shared his deep, and wide-range of intelligence to forge the United States into a new economic an industrial power in the world (McArdle). Jefferson’s philosophy, religious, and social characteristics steered him to perform uniquely in his lifetime. Jefferson’s philosophy derived from the prominent theologians of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, such as John locke and Lord Kames ; and this led him to write the Declaration of Independence. He proposed a comprehensive plan of “educational reform” to assure at lowest level the …show more content…
At age nine he attended in local school, later at seventeen, he left home to attend to the William and Mary College in Williamsburg, the capital of Virginia. While he was studying in college, he was in a circle of old elites; and he received his real education from them. After three years he decided to learn law. At the time, there was not any law school; hence, he studied law under very strict supervision of George Whyte- prominent jurist in law school- in five years. He practiced law successfully in Virginia (Gale, U.S. …show more content…
He believed that in order to function successfully in any field, an individual needs to gain core knowledge and education. Well-educated citizens were necessary for the formation of the new republic, and for a person to enjoy life. Jefferson was interested in both ancient Greek and Roman cultures and the process of the education in those nations. Despite the differences between Greek and Roman cultures, Jefferson found his firm ideology about American education from those nations. Jefferson’s schemes about what the students should learn, and to lesser extent, how they need to learn, was the root of twentieth-century movement to generate a new system in the curriculum. Jefferson had the faith that well-educated citizens can defense themselves against tyranny. Education had such a value to him that he assigned a bill, called More General Diffusion of Knowledge, as a part of his legislative program for the state of Virginia in 1779. He never wavered from his faith toward education as a “foundation for the survival of the new republic” (Carpenter). In a letter to Joseph C. Cabell in 1814, he expressed that one of those things that he wants to claim as a right is public education (Lipscomb and Bergh 1903, 14:84). To Jefferson a citizen who wants to function properly in the society should learn history of

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