Thomas Hobbes Crisis Analysis

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The crisis of modernity within political liberalism can be seen as a result of modern man slowly losing faith in reason and or as substantial factor to arguments that modern man will do anything he to achieve his vision of what greater human life is or can be. “As such, modern liberalism is predicted on the proposition that governments exist to maximize the liberty of their citizens to “pursue happiness,” in the words of Jefferson, or to satisfy their desires, as Hobbes would have it.” Where the crisis arises from is that “modern man no longer knows what he wants” and has lost “faith in reason’s ability to validate its highest aims” manifesting into a spiraling crisis where modern man creates an association between greater life and power. Through …show more content…
To truly understand Hobbes’ political thought process, one must understand his views on and about human nature. Human nature is “naturally driven by passion and interest, and has no incentive for altruism.” Which leads to nothing more besides distraction of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, in addition to “wars of all against all.” This lack of faith in humankind along with growing up through the entirety of the English Civil War created a prefect opportunity for modern break through in political liberalism known as Leviathan. Strongly recommended to anyone that would give him a listening hear that the only and correct way to have true political liberalism is to implement an authoritarian governmentally system. Thus, reflecting the crisis in the nature which is modern man’s ability to slowly lose faith in reason. With the ridge structure of an authoritarian government Hobbes, believes that human nature when is given “limited resources and no recognized authority” it creates a catalyst for the innate human desire allows for man’s powers to be both absolute and arbitrary.” One may be being questioning the fact that within Hobbes’ theory of political liberalism there is no liberty at all. The exact opposite is true. Liberty in the modern thought process of Hobbes is found within the state of nature, “all people possessed perfect, complete liberty.” Hobbes continues to analyze this concept of the state of nature and the formation of it in

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