Thomas Aquinas Influence On Religion

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Thomas Aquinas was a 13th century philosopher, theologian, logician. He became the driving force behind the Catholic church during the Scholastic movement. The church would often use Aquinas to defend the church in scholarly settings, and used his writings to teach incoming priests. During his time of writing one of his most famous works, Summa Theologica, the seventh crusade was coming to an end. This was also at a time where the Papacy was struggling to spread their claim farther and farther away from rome. Often attempting to accomplishing this through conquests on the basis that it was justified warfare. Thomas Aquinas’ just war ideology has allowed Christianity to expand because it allowed for justified warfare, papal abuse of this justifiable warfare, and an expansion of Papal land and power. …show more content…
He was born in the early thirteenth century in Italy. He spent the early part of his life in a monastery, at the age of thirteen he left to continue his education in Naples. This is when he was first introduced to philosophers like Aristotle. He went on to complete a doctorate in theology at the University of Paris. Following this he devoted his life to traveling and the attempt to join theology and philosophy. Aquinas became a very important figure within the church. He is considered now to be the greatest theologian the Catholic church has ever had, and his work is at the center of become a priest. Following the end of the seventh crusade he wrote his Summa Theologica in an attempt to bridge the gap between reason and faith. A mixture of philosophy and apologetics; a three part book discussing theology, ethics, and Christ. The important question for this argument is Question 40, Article 1, “whether any war is lawful.”1 This response laid out the three requirements for a justifiable

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