This Side Of Paradise By F. Scott Fitzgerald Analysis

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One of the most famous authors of American history, F. Scott Fitzgerald started out as a nothing, and he was a nothing. After he wrote his first novel to win over his one love, Zelda, Fitzgerald was a star. This first novel, This Side of Paradise, was his big break. The irony, though, is that Fitzgerald has a rags to riches story while his main character, Amory Blaine, has a riches to rags story. Fitzgerald used the society around him to assist in the historical context of the novel. He used the youth culture that he both experienced and observed; he shows the youth drinking excessively, doing drugs to get attention, and shows the creation and destruction of potential relationships. The first World War also greatly affected the plot of Fitzgerald’s …show more content…
Amory is born to a wealthy family that has the privilege of traveling the country and gain the best education in the country. After visiting Minneapolis, Amory decides that he wants to go to boarding school. His mother sends him to the elite St. Regis’ School in New Jersey. Here, Amory meets his mentor, Monsignor Darcy. They keep in touch for the rest of Darcy’s life. Amory was lazy when it came to school, but he had a passion for English, specifically literature. After graduating, Amory enrolls at Princeton University where he becomes friends with all different types of men. At Princeton, Amory becomes head of the Princetonian, the schools newspaper. Eventually, because of his laziness, Amory is kicked off the editing team and is put onto probation. In 1917, Amory enlists in the U.S. Army, dropping out of school. After coming back from Europe, Amory meets Rosalind, his true love. Due to his impoverished state, Rosalind dumps him and he begins to come closer to rock bottom, leading him on a quest for self realization. In the bildungsroman novel This Side of Paradise, F. Scott Fitzgerald draws on his own experiences maturing through adversity in a society where the American Dream is non-existent in order to show how life is not filled with endless opportunity. The irony of this is that the world looks at America as the land of great opportunity, when in reality there is no such thing as the …show more content…
Stephen Blaine wasn’t really around for Amory and his mother. He “hovered in the background” meaning that he just hangs around Amory and Beatrice being “unassertive” and staying away from being a father and a husband. Beatrice, on the other hand, is almost the man of the family: she controls where they go and what to spend money on; she is also the strong female character influencing Amory’s life. “Beatrice influences Amory so greatly in his childhood that he deems this time in his life ‘Amory plus Beatrice.’ She partly shapes his character, but he also perceives her shortcomings as a child and is not entirely molded by her influence” (Wood). Beatrice teaches Amory so well that he can pick out her flaws and does not take after these imperfections. Through her teachings, Amory picks out which philosophies to actually follow, for example, “she suggests Amory never rise early, and she tells him that his breakfast needs to always be brought up to him so that he may eat in bed and be idle...As a result, Amory tends to be lazy...expects that he will not have to work hard to win favor with people or to do well academically” (Wood). Her impact on Amory’s life leads him to be an

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