Ernest Hemingway's Influence On American Culture

1416 Words 6 Pages
Post World War 2, the United States seemed like the ideal place for Americans. For many Americans, this was a time in which they were able to live an easy life filled with adventure, culture, and gratitude for life. For those in the 20-30 age range, time was a pigment of their imagination; going about in life as if there were no end to it. They were more focused on having a great time and not having the worry of wars repercussion on their mind. Culture is what spoke to them and seemed to be the only thing on their mind. Yet, there was a group of people whose lives did not reflect America’s lifestyle, soldiers and their families. Many of them returned home with the horrifying images of killings and death engraved into their memories. Not knowing …show more content…
He married his first wife shortly after the end of the war and moved to Paris. This is when he was exposed to the whole isolationism from the world that many young people of war were facing. Just like the other Lost writers, he was tired and felt a irrelevancy from the old, traditional form of writing. Tired of this, he developed a new style and form or writing. In this new style he was sparse in language, broke away from traditional narration, and did not follow the traditional flowery writing-he thought of this to be too “old-school” (study). During his lifetime he wrote many short stories, essays, and novels. Two of his most popular novels are A Farewell to Arms and The Sun Also Rises. In The Sun Also Rises “The Lost Generation” was how the name marched its way into everyone’s mouths. This book not only popularized this name but it also helped to get Hemmingway be loved by many. The book’s theme is centered on how the characters (and of most writers from this era) were coping the affect war and disillusionment they were all going thru. This is how Hemingway was able to shine the light onto those who did not feel a part of the world. In his second best-seller A Farewell to Arms many of the events are of what happened to him or to those he lived with during his time in war. Like many writers from this era, they were all trying to find themselves and go back to the time that they had no worries on …show more content…
Scott Fitzgerald. He soared up in the literary world quickly and at a young age. Many of his books followed the timeline of his life. He had two books that had a lot of success were This Side of Paradise and The Great Gatsby. After the great success that Fitzgerald had with his first book, everything in his life started to crumble. He became an alcoholic while having to deal with his wife 's, Zelda, mental illness and jealousy. He really did not have a way of getting out and achieving happiness and success for both. Because of this, they both moved to Paris around the same time The Lost Generation was around Paris. Although he could not tolerate her jealousy and other issues, he never stopped loving her unconditionally. He and his wife, Zelda, were know for going from party to party with no end stop to it. This lavish, pompous lifestyle is perfectly reflected and written in Fitzgerald 's book The Great Gatsby. A book that captures the loneliness that many of the writers were feeling and how they would cover it up with parties, excessive drinking, etc.. The ending for many in the book resulted with a life that no one was willing to live and death; all common themes in the real world during this time. In the case of Fitzgerald, he lived a life that was filled of unhappy moments but was ended with a heart attack. He

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