What Are The Three Waves Of Feminism

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Despite the freedom that women have now, it is not equal to that of men. For this reason some women and men continue to fight for political, social and economic equality, this ideology is known as feminism. This political movement can also be divided into three waves throughout history and which still continues on to this day.
Women are treated as second-class citizens, not only in the United States of America, but all across the world in different countries. It is for this reason that women had decided to stand up not just for themselves as individuals, but also for future generations of women to come. It was that bravery that gave birth to the feminist movement. The first wave was during the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. At first it was focused on property rights for women and the opposition to chattel marriage. In the end of the nineteenth century, the movement mostly focused on political power, particularly the right of women’s suffrage. By
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It began in the United States and spread all across the Western world and beyond. The second wave began after women were kicked out of the workplace after the end of the World War II. Most of the movement’s energy was focused on passing the Equal Rights Amendment to the constitution guaranteeing social equality regardless of sex. The second wave was for women whom no longer accepted the housewife role as mandatory. They fought for the right to do what they wanted with their bodies, fought to end sexual and gender oppression. Second wave of feminism still exists and coexist with what is called third wave feminism.
The third wave of feminism started in the mid 90s as a response to the failures from the second wave. The third wave of feminism seeks to challenge the second wave’s essentialist definitions of femininity. During this time, many constructs like body, sexuality, gender, and heteronormativity were

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