Third Grade Scope And Sequence

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A scope and sequence of a given grade is the framework for which teachers based their year’s lessons on. The scope and sequence must take into account where the average given students cognitive development has reach to focus the material on concepts that they are ready for. For this paper, I choose to take a deeper look at a third grade scope and sequence. Third graders are generally eight years of age they have reach a point in their lives that they becoming more active in school and developing very distinct personalities. From Vastswimming website, we can see that by the age of 8 children are “becoming more aware of adult world and his place in it” (Vastswimming, Age Developmental Characteristics) developing an understanding of where they …show more content…
government is structured. Students at this age are often calling in question what is just and fair. In Erik Erikson Stages of Social-Emotional Development students at this point have reached the Industry Versus Inferiority (Competence) stage of development. As we see on the childdevelopmentinfo website “Here the child learns to master the more formal skills of life: (1) relating with peers according to rules (2) progressing from free play to play that may be elaborately structured by rules and may demand formal teamwork, suck as baseball and (3) mastering social studies, reading, arithmetic” (Child Development Institute, Stages of Social-Emotional Development-Erik Erikson). Understanding how a government is structured not only helps the student understand those intriguing concept of what can be conceived as just and fair. Powerful discussions of those topics can be address of how it is fair that student A is allowed extra time on their test when the rest of the class has less time. As well as help the students develop skills they will need as citizens. In the Maine Social Studies Learning Result’s Stand B is cited for development of Civics and Government skills. “Students draw concepts from civics and government to understand political systems, power, authority, governance, civic ideals and practices, and the role of citizens in the community, Maine, the United States, and world” (Maine Learning …show more content…
Where students explore their neighborhoods and its history of development. This is echoed in E.D. Hirsch’s core knowledge curriculum developed in the 1980’s. In Hirsch curriculum students at this level explore “first people” (ancient Greek/Roman, Americas, First Explorers) and how these groups affect the develop of their regions. In our textbook we see that: “the core knowledge books contain world and U.S. history, government, and geography at ascending degrees of complexity; they promote citizenship and character education through folklore and traditional children’s literature that focuses on values” (Duplass, p. 59). From the childdevelopmentinfo website students at this grade are able to “relate involved accounts of events, many of which occurred at some time in the past” (Child Development Institute, Language Development in Children). Exploring the use of primary and secondary sources to develop understanding of the past will create a rich learning environment for this students. Developing ideas of how their state was conceived by comparing those sources will give students opportunities to develop higher learning skills and appreciate the community they are living

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