Thinking About Political Reform Summary

Amazing Essays
Thinking About Political Reform by John R. Johannes is about making the American government operate smoother for the people and politics. Political reformers are faced with these challenging issues. They must think about what reforms are great for politics and if they will work out for the people. In the book Thinking About Political Reform Johannes discuss what reform is and list numerous reforms that can benefit American government. This essay is intended to break down each chapter of Thinking About Political Reform so the reader can understand the methods of the book and understand the framework of Thinking About Political Reform.

Chapter 1: A Framework for Thinking About Reform, “describes the current issues that are involved regarding
…show more content…
In this chapter it describes the type of government is used and the pros and cons. According to Johannes, “the Parliamentary government is the type of government that rest on the principle of concentrating political power, fusing legislative, and executive authority (16).” This type of government is considered to be effective and efficient. This type of government depends on strong political parties. The political parties elect their members using different methods, however, there are pros and cons in Parliamentary government. This government can be effective and efficient but has numerous vulnerabilities. Johannes stated a question, “would a parliamentary system be preferable to the American presidential system (18)?” However, who can truly say what type of government is prime. Every government is going to possess vulnerabilities. Moreover, I don 't believe that a Parliamentary government will benefit the American government since the American government is based on freedom and the people. A Parliamentary system gives entirely too much power to the leader and America’s government separates the party, however, the president is the leader. Therefore, I disagree that a Parliamentary system will benefit the American

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    The similarities of federalism and parliamentary sovereignty in the U.S. and Britain are founded on the power of the legislative body to the representational and territorial facts of democratic institutions. More so, the ability of the U.S. federal government as a “checks and balances” system provides a similar use of parliamentary power in the Congress. However, the U.S. relies more heavily on a tri-parte system of legislative government, which allows a certain concentration of war powers through presidentialism. These factors define the overarching power of the American presidency, which makes the president and the Congress accountable for their actions. In a contrasting way, the British parliament does not allow the same powers to the Prime Minister or The Queen as means of accountability in the governing process.…

    • 1343 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Essay On Conservatism

    • 1365 Words
    • 6 Pages

    “Our constitution is called a democracy because power is in the hands not of a minority but of the whole people”(Pericles 155-156). Our government of elected officials and the constituency are both heading down a dangerous path with our current political situation. It is hard for our politicians and government to make the American people happy in the current political situation when there are no solutions that are being given options to the public. And the current political situation in words is the government id not doing enough in the Untied States for everyone to co-exist the best they can. This is a problem because our country is made up of a variety of cultures and values.…

    • 1365 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    What Is Autocratic Power

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages

    I think people would think it is that way because they do not know how the system works or how to make it work to their advantage. Especially in representative democracies where people get vote for who represents them. In the UK a general election is where people vote for who will be a member in parliament and ultimately represent them until next election. Even though constitutional monarchies and representative democracies are a little different they kind of work the same, in which people hold some power. An oligarchy is where the elite hold all the power and the people have none, yes constitutional monarchies have an elite, but the royal family only has limited power and do not mandate laws.…

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    State governments will make it too difficult to maintain the national government, they are bias, and Americans should have a firm union in this new nation. Overall, he was completely against state governments. He favored a strong federal government made of many wealthy members. Moreover, Hamilton held a loose interpretation of the Constitution. He even supported sometimes restrictions on speech and press under certain circumstances.…

    • 1205 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It immediately politicizes the presidency because the constitution says nothing about how the veto power should be used, just that it can be used (Hurl 13-10-24). The creators of the constitution did not put the same constraints on executive power that they did legislative power, giving the president a great advantage. As previously explained, the president is free from the control of the legislative branch and is not accountable to it. That the legislative majority has no direct control over the presidency is one of the most fundamental differences between the American and Canadian political systems. However, despite it not having power over the president, the presidential veto allows the president to have some power over the legislative branch through his potential to use the veto power.…

    • 1290 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Two Presidencies Theory

    • 876 Words
    • 4 Pages

    While the president is able to pass executive orders to change policy, these orders may be defunded by congress, counteracted by congressional legislation, or deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. In addition, although a president is able to veto legislation, if a president continually vetoes legislation, the public may not look on him/her favorably, which would impact their electability. These factors seem to limit the president’s power greatly; however, so long as the president’s executive order is not unconstitutional, the president still wields remarkable power, as Congress would need a majority opposition in order to defund the president’s executive order. Furthermore, many of the president’s constituents could be swayed if the president were to deliver a speech concerning the necessity of his executive order. The executive branch, being the largest branch in government, requires that the president divides his power among the vice president, department heads, and heads of independent agencies in order to accomplish all of the administration’s tasks.…

    • 876 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Theory Of Polarization

    • 949 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Now this polarization is starting to affect the court system. The Republicans do not what the president to elect a liberal candidate for the US Supreme Court, because that will mean the Supreme Court majority would lie on the liberal side of issues rather than the conservative side. These ideas connect more with the elite-driven polarization theory, mostly because the elites are the people involved in Congress, Congress being the ones that make these decisions affecting the court system and the president’s…

    • 949 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Understanding the relationship between the president and congress is key in understanding American politics. Congress and the president cannot avoid engaging with one another, with a constitutional set up that demands they work together constructively. Congress has its roles to play in policy making as does the president. The president and congress are given certain powers in the constitution, that power is divvied up, so that neither one of these branches has too much power at one time (Fisher 2007). The founders of the constitution were very distrustful of the presidency and feared if the president was given too much power it would lead to demagogy (Dickinson 2008).…

    • 1004 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Examples Of Free Republics

    • 1365 Words
    • 6 Pages

    They no longer had free governments, but now tyrannical ones. I am in strong opposition to the Constitution, specifically, Articles One and Two. In the proposed Constitution the government possesses absolute power. I believe that it gives Congress too much power, it takes power away from local governments, it gives the President (Executive Branch) too much power, and the representation needs to be changed, just to name a few. The central government under the Articles of Confederation was too weak, but the one that…

    • 1365 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Patrick Henry said, in a speech to the Virginia ratifying convention, that he believed that America was too large and diverse to be ruled by one single government, and that any attempt at this kind of government would lead to tyranny. A similar speech in Pennsylvania stated that an extensive territory like the United States could be ruled only through a united confederation of republics. This summed up the feelings of many Americans at the time- they knew and trusted smaller state governments, and believed that a national government would be too distant. This was an understandable reaction. Americans had no experience with the governing of a country as large as the United States.…

    • 1330 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays