Theory Of The Salem Witch Trials

1369 Words 6 Pages
Many centuries have passed since the infamous Salem Witch Trials happened. Since then, many religions have been created going against the Puritan ways. After the trials, many theories have been made, contemplating how the trials themselves began. Many theories have sided with the fact, that the girls were tricked by Abigail Williams or that the Devil himself was part of the ordeal. Since no one can really say what happened, more hypotheses are made over time, but many agree that these trials created a genocide that caused fear in the people, even to this day. The Salem Witch Trials would have never taken place had one thing not happen, but the trails had to happen so the people would feel safe in their own town. Readers know the witch trials …show more content…
With rumors of evil being spread around like wildfire, the townspeople did not want to believe at first, but when the first group of girls were found in the forest, dancing half naked and screaming, the townspeople believed the worse. There was a supposed witch among them, is what the townspeople thought. With a town full of Puritan worshipers, they believed that the Devil himself was in the area. They thought the Devil was using witches to possess the innocent people to do his bidding. To stop all the nonsense of witchcraft, the church decided to take it upon themselves, and question the townspeople. They began to accuse, question, and hang those who did not follow the Puritan ways. It struck fear in the townspeople and made them more cautious around others. The Puritan religion became tarnished when the church used its power to accuse the people. Eventually 19 people were hanged after the supposed possessed girls starting pointing fingers, because of a prank going wrong. But again many people do not know the truth about Salem. Andrews has contemplated that the townspeople’s main crops, Rye, was infected with a fungus called Ergot. With this food poisoning came muscle spasm, delusions, seizures, and contortions that looked exactly similar to the afflicted girls. This fungus is usually in warm, damp areas and during that time of 1691, it rained heavily and why the trials …show more content…
Puritans were members of a group of English Protestants who sought to simplify and regulate forms of worship, and with the Puritan code everything was very strict. This religion had a big effect on the people of Massachusetts. Church was such a sacred place for the people and it was against the law to not attend. The townspeople would grow suspicious if a member would not attend, because of this the fear they thought the missing member would be a witch. In the questioning trials they would bring up why the member have not gone to church and use that against them. The church had so much power and with the Puritan code it was even stronger. The Puritan lifestyle was watched by the church, so they had to work hard each day to conceal their emotions and opinions. Even their style of clothing, dark and somber, was influenced by the church. In their long hours of church service, they would have men and women sit on opposite sides of each other. The moral code that the church created made them believe that all sins should be punished. Since they worshipped the Lord, they knew he was the only one who could punish the sinners, so when a neighbor or friend had rotting crops or sickly in their house, they believed it was because God was punishing them and the people would not bother to help. Of course the townspeople believe that the

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