Black Power Movement Analysis

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The main point of the Black Power era was the ideologies of revolutionary nationalists. The ideologies included the belief that there is a right of self- determination. In the Third World, alliances were made with white radicals, with in those relationships; black laboring would cause a leadership vanguard, and eventually through revolutionary struggle banish neo- colonial imperialists from the globe and guide an era of unprecedented gains for humanity. Humanity, as others may define kindness from one human to another. The humanity in the 1960s was inexistent. The communities between White Americans, and example of African Diaspora (Black Americans) were very segregated, and lacked equality. Blacks were known to be afraid of whites. Around …show more content…
This perception sparked discretion to consider the Black Power Movement given usual negative association of violence with potential radicalism. What people do not know is the Black Panther Party, as well as the Black Power Movement in general did not solely focus on separatism. The prime focus that was initially developed by Malcolm X and later used by the Black Panther’s was to control their communities rather than integrate into white communities. With that being said, Huey P. Newton also took the time to explain the position in which the Panther Party held during an interview in Ebony Magazine. According the Newton “The Black Panther Party felt that the institutions were illegitimate, because they failed to meet the needs of the people. Therefore, they had no right to exist. The Party felt that in the interest of the people, new institutions, both political and economic should be established and that the old institutions should disappear” (Newton, 1969). Therefore, the Panthers worked to attempt to change humanity …show more content…
In 1972 the initial ideology (Racial oppression of black people) of the Panther Party changed at the United Front Against Fascism conference. Seale and Newton began to focus on class struggle and not racial struggles. This influenced alliances with white and Third World revolutionary groups in the United States. Hence the theory of Black Panther Party combining revolutionary black nationalism with Third World adaptions of Marxism- Leninism that was stated on page 1 of the text. These alliances influenced the force of cleansing violence; which frees the despair of inferiority. Developing this change caused four major platforms: 1) oppressed people 2) oppressed communities 3) black communities and 4) black people. Along, with those changes would also come ideological changes that would cause the Party to decline. The main cause was its affiliation with legal defense of its leadership who was arrested and faced criminal charges. Those charges caused their finances to diminish. Another factor was that the defense to passive resistance became a threat to the government. Resulting in attracting the attention of J. Edgar Hoover, head of the FBI. As a result of his paranoia he began to take the steps necessary to destroy the Panther Party. Hoover used the Counterintelligence Program to complete this mission. Although, the party does not exist

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