Weber's Theory Of Capitalism

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grows in power as bureaucratic organizations expand in numbers (3/15). Another theory of Weber’s is that we need to look at history to make sense of society. Capitalistic history has been dispersed in many forms throughout history. He looks at specific societies and at specific time periods. Generalized key components are the ideal type of capitalism in its purest form. He looks at the specific history of capitalism in each country to see which countries are more developed and which ones are not. (2/23) We are not controlled by social structure, but rethink how we understand society. In other words we go against social structure and change it to understand how we act in this world in order to live. (3/1) He also discusses how religion plays …show more content…
They make judgement values, and critique power and they foresee that value and wealth must increase in capitalism. (2/25) Capitalist also re-invest in production and wealth (2/23). Protestants become the new religion, which promotes free labor. (2/25) Free labor is economically compelled and makes people work because of the fear of unemployment. Just the fear of hunger drives people to work. According to Weber capitalism is impossible without free labor (pg. 38). Modern capitalism is derived from the development of trading that is independent from rural areas (pg. 37-38). The machine, which in a modern factory is common, with the attentiveness of ownership in the workplace, means of work, source of power, and raw material are all derived from the same hand and that of the entrepreneur. Weber deliberates all forms of profit is through trade and exchange, which represent capitalism. (pg. 39) Previous capitalism prevents a rationalistic economic life. (pg. 50) It consists of self-denial, strictness, and also a type of religious self-denial (pg. 51-52). In traditional times material interests were occupied in the preservation of tradition (pg. 50-51). There is a restricted inclination toward rationalization and …show more content…
Power is significant and is to be achieved by market and class. Class relationships are defined by an era’s means of production. (3/14) However, eventually these relationships cease to be compatible with the developing forces of production. At this point, a revolution occurs and a new class emerges as a ruling one, which is driven by larger economic forces. (pg. 2 & 3) One thing that Marx does not focus on is economics, but does realize that one does need to understand economics to understand capitalism. Marx theorized that we need to overthrow capitalism and a global revolution need to transpire to overcome some of society’s conflicts and struggles. He is intensive on the now or the present when it comes to a system of production and the accumulation of wealth on class. (3/17) Like Durkheim, Marx uses a linear approach, which results in one thing leading to another. As simple as one thing going from point A to point B. (2/9) Marx talks about how capitalism is derived from the past. His main focus is on class because it is made up of people from different genders, races, and so on. He is not focused on social conflict, but class conflict. Yet again, Marx’s concentrations are on how and why capitalism needs to be overthrown. It is not practical to reform capitalism

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