Theories Of Strategic Human Resource Management

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According to Lepak and Shaw (2008), the field of strategic human resource management (SHRM) has made tremendous strides over the years, and while some theorists might disagree on what is described as some of the subtleties concerning this field of HR. It has many distinguishing attributes compared to other lines of HR research (Lepak & Shaw, 2008). For instance, though there appears to be exceptions, SHRM tends to focus on organizational performance outcomes and perception of management concerning organization performance. This is because SHRM appears to be concerned about the relationship between human resource management (HRM) and strategic management in a particular organization (Nigam, Nongmaithem, Sharma, & Tripathi, 2011). Thus, it tends …show more content…
As a result, one might argue that a business –level strategy tends to reflect a particular organization’s perspective about where and how it has an advantage over its competing rivals (Yao-Sheng, 2005). According to Yao-Sheng (2005), different theorists appeared to have classified business strategy differently. For instance, theorists such as Miles and Snow classified business strategy into three main types: prospectors, defenders, and analyzers. Meanwhile, theorists such as Schuler and Jackson have classified business strategy into three main types: cost-reduction, quality-enhancement, and innovation. However, several researchers and scholars appear to have applied this type of classification (Yao-Sheng, 2005). For example, the cost-reduction strategy tends to involve enhancing a particular organization’s competitiveness by reducing the price of its product/service such as the price of an airline ticket. According to Yao-Sheng (2005), this strategy tends to enhance what is described as production efficiency and lessens expenses when a particular organization usually adopts new technology, increasing its scale of production, or re-engineers its production processes in order that the particular …show more content…
One might argue that a control perspective is consistent with the behavioral perspective (Yao-Sheng, 2005). According to Yao-Sheng (2005), the concept of control might be explained as a process that assists the alignment of people (e.g., employees) with the interest of a particular organization. As a result, one might argue that rather than assessing particular HRM practices in isolation (e.g., staffing, training, among others). Instead, one combines these HRM practices into three main types of control systems, namely: input control, output control, and behavior control. For instance, according to Yao-Sheng (2005), theorists such as Snell opined that the behavior control tends to have implications for what is described as responsibilities that are standardized and enforced top-down with a paramount concern for procedures and methods. In essence, the behavior control perspective attempts to eliminate a sense of unpredictability by what is described as routinizing an organization’s transformation process. Furthermore, behavior control usually makes an employee becomes accountable for one’s action, irrespective of results (Yao-Sheng,

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