Theories Of Social Identity Theory

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Register to read the introduction… This concept of identity can be related to various levels, such as nationality, ethnicity, religion, color or other characteristics. The result of this is that individuals are able to place themselves within groups that embody such characteristics. Individuals can maintain membership of more than one group. Social Identity theory believes that ‘humans define themselves, as well as others, largely in terms of the social groups to which they belong’. Social intolerance can be seen to develop from relations between different groups, ‘One of the major motivational assumptions of social identity theory is that all people will strive to achieve a positive social identity.’ As a result of the desire for positive affiliation, to evaluate their own group positively, they are often – though not always motivated to evaluate other groups negatively. This underpins the tendency for social tensions to develop, as it is often installed by the conviction that certain groups are superior. Pressures therefore often arise, as groups believe that the positive elements within ones own group needs to be protected from the negative influences attributed to others. This can result in social prejudice and discrimination where ‘subordinate groups have predominantly negative stereotypic attributions when evaluated by dominant group …show more content…
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