Theories Of Skocpol And Tilly's Theory Of Revolution

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Structural Theories of Revolution Barrington Moore is regarded as a lead theorist when scholars and scientists study revolutions. Theda Skocpol and Charles Tilly were both students of Moore, during his time as a professor at Harvard University (Barrington). Skocpol and Tilly developed theories influenced by Moore; however, all three theorist’s conclusions as to why revolutions occur and why they have the outcomes they do differs vastly. While all three theories are structure oriented, the conducive elements for revolution varies. This paper will compare the theories of Skocpol and Tilly while attempting to find relations to Moore’s own theory of revolution. Both Skocpol and Tilly would agree revolutions are unique. Skocpol argues that throughout …show more content…
Skocpol argues revolutions are swift and quick transformations carried out by the lower classes (Skocpol). Comparably, Tilly reasons that the structural changes in government are caused by elites defecting in support or solidarity of the lower classes (Tilly). Both theories argue that class structure is an essential catalyst for revolution. More specifically, the two theories emphasize the importance of a strong lower class identity. Additionally, both theorist empathize the importance of a multi-group stricture being present for revolutionary outcomes. Tilly discusses the need for two or more groups competing for control of the state (Young Charles). Skocpol similarly, discusses the need for a rise in grievances among one social class attempting to overthrow the dominate, ruling class (Skocpol). Comparably, both theorists accentuate the importance of a divergent social …show more content…
Skocpol’s theory is developed toward understanding both domestic and international impacts and outcomes of revolutions. Skocpol believes that international socioeconomic constraints of the global landscape determine the orientation of the regime once it is established (Young Theda). Tilly’s theory is centered on understanding revolutionary disputes and outcomes strictly on a domestic level (Young Charles). The discrepancy in the level of analysis may allow Skocpol to have a more convincing theory when understanding revolutions effects on the global stage. Such theoretical adaptability is particularly useful when investigating the impacts a given uprising has on the growingly globalized

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