Theories Of Class Struggle

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The theory of class struggle is unveiled under the dynamics of competitive capitalism. The working class is continually exploited by the bourgeoisie, through collective overproduction and private appropriation of surplus. The latent exploitation of workers is corroborated as profit (Tucker 209). The anarchy of the markets mandates the bourgeoisie to perfect machinery, and reduce specialized labor power. A consequence of advancing automation will usher forth the crises of overproduction: increased production of goods and not enough buyers, syndicating mean of productions “... in a few hands” (477). Both the capitalist’s crises and competition, creates continual tension within the mode of production: overly simplified workers, an increased demand …show more content…
Lonmin dependency to generate profit is shown in the exploitation of the workers. Judge Farlan was inquired by the counsel “.. that it was possible for Lonmin to close the mine..for business reason, it elected not do so” (Davies). This dependency to exploit miners has polarized the miners live in the shadow of Lonmin in” ..one-room shack..no roads, only dirt tracks”(Davies).They control the miners’ living conditions to generate profit. AMCU repeatedly warned the miners Lonmin will replace them and perpetuate the cycle of disparity. The strike posed a threat and Lonmin security opening fire with rubber bullets, firing more than 40 rounds at the strikers (Davies). The miner’s are not only a class in itself but for itself, where the conditions lead to organized class struggle supporting M&E theory. Lonmin strike influenced by strikes held by Impala Platinum, where worker successfully managed an increase of wages. The initial strikes were held by a small groups of strikers who went around ‘toyi-toyied’– urging them to join them (Davies 3). Moreover, every year the government aligned unions such as National Union of Miners (NUM), hold a “strike season.. approximately three months - Fight employers for higher wages.” (Fairbanks 2). Who are affiliated with main African National Congress. It diverges from the theory because class struggle did not lead to …show more content…
As the strike progressed, South African police service(SAPS) use of force drastically escalated to barbaric behavior against the miners. On the day of the massacre, SAPS officers were given swat attire, and instructed to surrounded strikers walking down the koppie, then fired “295 bullets many aimed..men huddling below”(Davis). Moreover, any opposition against the government, bureaucratic entities like the tax departments uses its leverage of “outstanding tax bills” (Fairbanks) to shut it down. As tensions kept on rising among SAPS and miners, the thousand threads between the capitalist and governments became more visible. An intensive review the committee found the leaders of SAPS were influenced by Lonmin executives and NUM to suppress the strike of the workers. However the bureaucratic state mystified the grievance stunting the revolution of the miner, the commision of inquiry took a nearly a year to make decision against the action of the SAPS leaders, and then not resolving it satisfactory. Many felt angered, since the government longer represented the interest of the miners, and their representative, “‘Ramaphosa has shares in the mine now,...’‘How can he speak for us?’” (Fairbanks 8).The representative body was nothing more than body of talking shops, creating illusory project of equity to fool the common

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